The Spencer's curve

Clinical implications of a classic hemodynamic model

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Merrill P Spencer and John M Reid applied the Hagen-Poiseuille law, continuity principle, and cerebrovascular resistance to describe a theoretical model of the relationship between the flowvelocity, flowvolume, and decreasing size of the residual vessel lumen. The model was plotted in a graph that became widely known as the Spencer's curve. Although derived for a smooth and axis-symmetric arterial stenosis of a short length in a segment with no bifurcations being perfused at stable arterial pressures and viscosity, this model represents a milestone in understanding cerebral hemodynamics with long-lasting practical and research implications. This review summarizes several hemodynamic principles that determine velocity and flowvolume changes, explains how the model aids interpretation of cerebrovascular ultrasound studies, and describes its impact on clinical practice and research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)6-10
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Neuroimaging
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2007
Externally publishedYes

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Hemodynamics
Research
Viscosity
Arterial Pressure
Pathologic Constriction
Theoretical Models

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

The Spencer's curve : Clinical implications of a classic hemodynamic model. / Alexandrov, Andrei.

In: Journal of Neuroimaging, Vol. 17, No. 1, 01.01.2007, p. 6-10.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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