The supine view in double-contrast knee arthrography

J. E. Salazar, J. I. Sebes, Randall Scott

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Knee arthrography is a widely used diagnostic procedure, but there is disagreement regarding the relative efficacy of single vs. double-contrast examinations in the evaluation for meniscal tears. In 353 double-contrast knee arthrograms, combining supine positioning with the routinely accepted prone views, there were 222 meniscal tears diagnosed using prone positioning alone, and seven additional tears were found with the added supine maneuver. Even though the knee joint was distended with both contrast material and air, the prone views tended to outline the meniscus in a double-contrast fashion, whereas the supine views provided single positive contrast detail of the same area. Supine views are particularly helpful when an obvious meniscal tear is not fluoroscopically apparent during prone filming.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)585-586
Number of pages2
JournalAmerican Journal of Roentgenology
Volume141
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1983

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Arthrography
Tears
Knee
Knee Joint
Contrast Media
Air

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

The supine view in double-contrast knee arthrography. / Salazar, J. E.; Sebes, J. I.; Scott, Randall.

In: American Journal of Roentgenology, Vol. 141, No. 3, 01.01.1983, p. 585-586.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Salazar, J. E. ; Sebes, J. I. ; Scott, Randall. / The supine view in double-contrast knee arthrography. In: American Journal of Roentgenology. 1983 ; Vol. 141, No. 3. pp. 585-586.
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