The Synergistic Effect of Hypercholesterolemia and Mechanical Injury on Intimal Hyperplasia

Scott Stevens, Klaus Hilgarth, Una S. Ryan, Jeffrey Trachtenberg, Eric Choi, Allan D. Callow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In an attempt to clarify data obtained from animal models of intimal hyperplasia, we used New Zealand white rabbits, a standardized balloon catheter injury model, and a 0.25% cholesterol supplemented diet. The effects of mechanical injury and hypercholesterolemia separately and combined were determined at the carotid and iliac positions at 12 weeks. En-face planimetry of lesioned intima and measurement of transverse intima-to-media thickness were taken as indices of intimal hyperplasia. No animals received antiplatelet agents or postoperative anticoagulation and all vessels remained patent. Neither procedure alone resulted in statistically significant lesion increase. However, combinations of injury and cholesterol resulted in statistically significant and synergistic lesion enhancement. The quantitative data, coupled with distinctive features noted on scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, showed separate and synergistic effects of mechanical injury and cholesterol diet on intimal lesions in this model. Additionally, these effects must be considered in evaluation of animal models of intimal hyperplasia and atherosclerosis. Furthermore, this may help dissect mechanisms of failed revascularizations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)55-61
Number of pages7
JournalAnnals of Vascular Surgery
Volume6
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1992
Externally publishedYes

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Tunica Intima
Hypercholesterolemia
Hyperplasia
Cholesterol
Wounds and Injuries
Animal Models
Diet
Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors
Transmission Electron Microscopy
Electron Scanning Microscopy
Atherosclerosis
Catheters
Rabbits

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

The Synergistic Effect of Hypercholesterolemia and Mechanical Injury on Intimal Hyperplasia. / Stevens, Scott; Hilgarth, Klaus; Ryan, Una S.; Trachtenberg, Jeffrey; Choi, Eric; Callow, Allan D.

In: Annals of Vascular Surgery, Vol. 6, No. 1, 01.01.1992, p. 55-61.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Stevens, Scott ; Hilgarth, Klaus ; Ryan, Una S. ; Trachtenberg, Jeffrey ; Choi, Eric ; Callow, Allan D. / The Synergistic Effect of Hypercholesterolemia and Mechanical Injury on Intimal Hyperplasia. In: Annals of Vascular Surgery. 1992 ; Vol. 6, No. 1. pp. 55-61.
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