The University of Tennessee Teaching Effectiveness Score.

Joseph Santoso, Miriam Tyndall, Thomas Elmore, Todd Tillmanns, Jim Wan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: We studied medical student evaluation of their Obstetrics and Gynecology faculty defined as Teaching Effectiveness Score (TES). We also evaluated the role of sharing TES to all faculty transparently in enhancing teaching interest among faculty. METHODS: Students evaluated faculty with questions: Which faculty enhanced or least aided your learning and why? The TES was calculated by adding the number of positive comments, subtracting the negative comments, and dividing this total by the amount of students on the rotation. TES was distributed to all attending physicians via email allowing faculty to see each other's evaluaton. RESULTS: 203 third-year medical students evaluated 25 attending physicians. The median TES was 3.2 percent (range -0.4 to 100 percent) with two attending physicians scoring high (p<0.01). A trend test showed the change was quadratic: the faculty's TES increased initially then decreased over time (p=0.053 to 0.409). A high TES is associated with teaching awards. High TES is not associated with age (p=0.77), academic rank (p=0.71), gender (p=0.89), race (p=0.55). CONCLUSION: TES measured teaching effectiveness as perceived by students. Transparency of TES induced interests in teaching initially but then declined with time.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)43-46
Number of pages4
JournalTennessee medicine : journal of the Tennessee Medical Association
Volume102
Issue number12
StatePublished - Jan 1 2009

Fingerprint

Teaching
Students
Physicians
Medical Students
Gynecology
Obstetrics
Learning

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

The University of Tennessee Teaching Effectiveness Score. / Santoso, Joseph; Tyndall, Miriam; Elmore, Thomas; Tillmanns, Todd; Wan, Jim.

In: Tennessee medicine : journal of the Tennessee Medical Association, Vol. 102, No. 12, 01.01.2009, p. 43-46.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{0ef32fdcdcee4764bd536d4b6bf80c54,
title = "The University of Tennessee Teaching Effectiveness Score.",
abstract = "OBJECTIVES: We studied medical student evaluation of their Obstetrics and Gynecology faculty defined as Teaching Effectiveness Score (TES). We also evaluated the role of sharing TES to all faculty transparently in enhancing teaching interest among faculty. METHODS: Students evaluated faculty with questions: Which faculty enhanced or least aided your learning and why? The TES was calculated by adding the number of positive comments, subtracting the negative comments, and dividing this total by the amount of students on the rotation. TES was distributed to all attending physicians via email allowing faculty to see each other's evaluaton. RESULTS: 203 third-year medical students evaluated 25 attending physicians. The median TES was 3.2 percent (range -0.4 to 100 percent) with two attending physicians scoring high (p<0.01). A trend test showed the change was quadratic: the faculty's TES increased initially then decreased over time (p=0.053 to 0.409). A high TES is associated with teaching awards. High TES is not associated with age (p=0.77), academic rank (p=0.71), gender (p=0.89), race (p=0.55). CONCLUSION: TES measured teaching effectiveness as perceived by students. Transparency of TES induced interests in teaching initially but then declined with time.",
author = "Joseph Santoso and Miriam Tyndall and Thomas Elmore and Todd Tillmanns and Jim Wan",
year = "2009",
month = "1",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "102",
pages = "43--46",
journal = "Journal of the Tennessee Medical Association",
issn = "1088-6222",
publisher = "Tennessee Medical Association",
number = "12",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The University of Tennessee Teaching Effectiveness Score.

AU - Santoso, Joseph

AU - Tyndall, Miriam

AU - Elmore, Thomas

AU - Tillmanns, Todd

AU - Wan, Jim

PY - 2009/1/1

Y1 - 2009/1/1

N2 - OBJECTIVES: We studied medical student evaluation of their Obstetrics and Gynecology faculty defined as Teaching Effectiveness Score (TES). We also evaluated the role of sharing TES to all faculty transparently in enhancing teaching interest among faculty. METHODS: Students evaluated faculty with questions: Which faculty enhanced or least aided your learning and why? The TES was calculated by adding the number of positive comments, subtracting the negative comments, and dividing this total by the amount of students on the rotation. TES was distributed to all attending physicians via email allowing faculty to see each other's evaluaton. RESULTS: 203 third-year medical students evaluated 25 attending physicians. The median TES was 3.2 percent (range -0.4 to 100 percent) with two attending physicians scoring high (p<0.01). A trend test showed the change was quadratic: the faculty's TES increased initially then decreased over time (p=0.053 to 0.409). A high TES is associated with teaching awards. High TES is not associated with age (p=0.77), academic rank (p=0.71), gender (p=0.89), race (p=0.55). CONCLUSION: TES measured teaching effectiveness as perceived by students. Transparency of TES induced interests in teaching initially but then declined with time.

AB - OBJECTIVES: We studied medical student evaluation of their Obstetrics and Gynecology faculty defined as Teaching Effectiveness Score (TES). We also evaluated the role of sharing TES to all faculty transparently in enhancing teaching interest among faculty. METHODS: Students evaluated faculty with questions: Which faculty enhanced or least aided your learning and why? The TES was calculated by adding the number of positive comments, subtracting the negative comments, and dividing this total by the amount of students on the rotation. TES was distributed to all attending physicians via email allowing faculty to see each other's evaluaton. RESULTS: 203 third-year medical students evaluated 25 attending physicians. The median TES was 3.2 percent (range -0.4 to 100 percent) with two attending physicians scoring high (p<0.01). A trend test showed the change was quadratic: the faculty's TES increased initially then decreased over time (p=0.053 to 0.409). A high TES is associated with teaching awards. High TES is not associated with age (p=0.77), academic rank (p=0.71), gender (p=0.89), race (p=0.55). CONCLUSION: TES measured teaching effectiveness as perceived by students. Transparency of TES induced interests in teaching initially but then declined with time.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77649316488&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=77649316488&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 102

SP - 43

EP - 46

JO - Journal of the Tennessee Medical Association

JF - Journal of the Tennessee Medical Association

SN - 1088-6222

IS - 12

ER -