The US air force suicide prevention program

Implications for public health policy

Kerry L. Knox, Steven Pflanz, Gerald Talcott, Rick L. Campise, Jill E. Lavigne, Alina Bajorska, Xin Tu, Eric D. Caine

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

61 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives. We evaluated the effectiveness of the US Air Force Suicide Prevention Program (AFSPP) in reducing suicide, and we measured the extent to which air force installations implemented the program. Methods. We determined the AFSPP's impact on suicide rates in the air force by applying an intervention regression model to data from 1981 through 2008, providing 16 years of data before the program's 1997 launch and 11 years of data after launch. Also, we measured implementation of program components at 2 points in time: during a 2004 increase in suicide rates, and 2 years afterward. Results. Suicide rates in the air force were signi?cantly lower after the AFSPP was launched than before, except during 2004. We also determined that the program was being implemented less rigorously in 2004. Conclusions. The AFSPP effectively prevented suicides in the US Air Force. The long-term effectiveness of this program depends upon extensive implementation and effective monitoring of implementation. Suicides can be reduced through amultilayered, overlapping approach that encompasses key prevention domains and tracks implementation of program activities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2457-2463
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume100
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2010

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Public Policy
Health Policy
Suicide
Public Health
Air
Program Evaluation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Knox, K. L., Pflanz, S., Talcott, G., Campise, R. L., Lavigne, J. E., Bajorska, A., ... Caine, E. D. (2010). The US air force suicide prevention program: Implications for public health policy. American Journal of Public Health, 100(12), 2457-2463. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2009.159871

The US air force suicide prevention program : Implications for public health policy. / Knox, Kerry L.; Pflanz, Steven; Talcott, Gerald; Campise, Rick L.; Lavigne, Jill E.; Bajorska, Alina; Tu, Xin; Caine, Eric D.

In: American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 100, No. 12, 01.12.2010, p. 2457-2463.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Knox, KL, Pflanz, S, Talcott, G, Campise, RL, Lavigne, JE, Bajorska, A, Tu, X & Caine, ED 2010, 'The US air force suicide prevention program: Implications for public health policy', American Journal of Public Health, vol. 100, no. 12, pp. 2457-2463. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2009.159871
Knox KL, Pflanz S, Talcott G, Campise RL, Lavigne JE, Bajorska A et al. The US air force suicide prevention program: Implications for public health policy. American Journal of Public Health. 2010 Dec 1;100(12):2457-2463. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2009.159871
Knox, Kerry L. ; Pflanz, Steven ; Talcott, Gerald ; Campise, Rick L. ; Lavigne, Jill E. ; Bajorska, Alina ; Tu, Xin ; Caine, Eric D. / The US air force suicide prevention program : Implications for public health policy. In: American Journal of Public Health. 2010 ; Vol. 100, No. 12. pp. 2457-2463.
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