The use of a Berlin Heart EXCOR LVAD in a child receiving chemotherapy for Castleman's disease

Tamara O. Thomas, Shanmuganathan Chandrakasan, Maureen O'Brien, John Jefferies, Thomas D. Ryan, Ivan Wilmot, Michael L. Baker, Peace C. Madueme, David Morales, Angela Lorts

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We present the unique case of a pediatric patient who received chemotherapy for a diagnosis of CD, while mechanically supported with a Berlin EXCOR LVAD secondary to restrictive cardiomyopathy. A four-yr-old previously healthy male with restrictive cardiomyopathy required MCS after cardiac arrest but was diagnosed with multicentric CD, a non-malignant lymphoproliferative disorder fueled by excessive IL-6 production. Treatment with IL-6 blockade (tocilizumab) every two wk and methylprednisolone had no effect on his lymph nodes or cardiac function while on temporary RotaFlow. A Berlin LVAD was placed for treatment with rituximab, COP, vincristine, and methylprednisolone. After three courses of chemotherapy, his inflammatory markers normalized and his lymphadenopathy decreased but cardiac function remained severely depressed. He tolerated chemotherapy on the Berlin but required frequent titrations of his anti-coagulation regimen and he did suffer a hemorrhagic stroke. His clinical status improved significantly with rehabilitation, and he tolerated heart transplantation without further complications. MCS is a feasible option as a bridge to recovery or heart transplant eligibility for patients with hemodynamic collapse requiring chemotherapy but it does necessitate close titration of the anti-coagulation regimen to coincide with changes in the inflammatory state.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)E15-E18
JournalPediatric transplantation
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Giant Lymph Node Hyperplasia
Berlin
Restrictive Cardiomyopathy
Drug Therapy
Methylprednisolone
Interleukin-6
Lymphoproliferative Disorders
Vincristine
Heart Transplantation
Heart Arrest
Rehabilitation
Lymph Nodes
Hemodynamics
Stroke
Pediatrics
Transplants
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Transplantation

Cite this

Thomas, T. O., Chandrakasan, S., O'Brien, M., Jefferies, J., Ryan, T. D., Wilmot, I., ... Lorts, A. (2015). The use of a Berlin Heart EXCOR LVAD in a child receiving chemotherapy for Castleman's disease. Pediatric transplantation, 19(1), E15-E18. https://doi.org/10.1111/petr.12398

The use of a Berlin Heart EXCOR LVAD in a child receiving chemotherapy for Castleman's disease. / Thomas, Tamara O.; Chandrakasan, Shanmuganathan; O'Brien, Maureen; Jefferies, John; Ryan, Thomas D.; Wilmot, Ivan; Baker, Michael L.; Madueme, Peace C.; Morales, David; Lorts, Angela.

In: Pediatric transplantation, Vol. 19, No. 1, 01.02.2015, p. E15-E18.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Thomas, TO, Chandrakasan, S, O'Brien, M, Jefferies, J, Ryan, TD, Wilmot, I, Baker, ML, Madueme, PC, Morales, D & Lorts, A 2015, 'The use of a Berlin Heart EXCOR LVAD in a child receiving chemotherapy for Castleman's disease', Pediatric transplantation, vol. 19, no. 1, pp. E15-E18. https://doi.org/10.1111/petr.12398
Thomas, Tamara O. ; Chandrakasan, Shanmuganathan ; O'Brien, Maureen ; Jefferies, John ; Ryan, Thomas D. ; Wilmot, Ivan ; Baker, Michael L. ; Madueme, Peace C. ; Morales, David ; Lorts, Angela. / The use of a Berlin Heart EXCOR LVAD in a child receiving chemotherapy for Castleman's disease. In: Pediatric transplantation. 2015 ; Vol. 19, No. 1. pp. E15-E18.
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