The use of radionuclide angiography to study blood flow through endothelial cell seeded extrathoracic bypass grafts in the dog

Jill E. Sackman, Gregory B. Daniel, Michael Freeman, Clinton D. Lothrop

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Endothelial seeding of vascular grafts has been shown to decrease graft thrombogenicity and prolong longevity when implanted in vivo. Previous studies have utilized anatomic grafts to study endothelialization and healing. Anatomic thoracoabdominal grafts do not allow for sequential biopsy for evaluation of individual grafts nor do they approximate the environment for long bypass grafts used in limb salvage. This study evaluated the use of an extra-an atomic aortic bypass graft to assess the healing of endothelial cell seeded expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE). Radionuclide angiography was used to evaluate graft patency and quantify blood flow through the graft. Dogs underwent placement of an extra-anatomic 60 cm long, 8 mm internal diameter, graft seeded with autologous endothelium. Grafts were biopsied from 2 weeks up to 1 year. Radionuclide studies were performed postimplantation and following each graft biopsy. Graft placement and biopsies were well tolerated in all dogs. Biopsied segments of graft allowed for sequential studies of the healing of implanted grafts by scanning electron and light microscopy. Flow through the implanted graft was close to 50% of the total caudal abdominal aortic flow. No significant difference in graft flow was noted either between animals or over time. Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound, Vol. 38, No. 2, 1997, pp 150-155.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)150-155
Number of pages6
JournalVeterinary Radiology and Ultrasound
Volume38
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1997

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Radionuclide Angiography
radionuclides
blood flow
endothelial cells
biopsy
Endothelial Cells
Dogs
Transplants
dogs
radiology
endothelium
limbs (animal)
blood vessels
light microscopy
scanning electron microscopy
sowing
animals
Biopsy
Limb Salvage

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

The use of radionuclide angiography to study blood flow through endothelial cell seeded extrathoracic bypass grafts in the dog. / Sackman, Jill E.; Daniel, Gregory B.; Freeman, Michael; Lothrop, Clinton D.

In: Veterinary Radiology and Ultrasound, Vol. 38, No. 2, 01.01.1997, p. 150-155.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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