The utility of the beck depression inventory in a bariatric surgery population

Rebecca Krukowski, Kelli E. Friedman, Katherine L. Applegate

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) is commonly used in bariatric surgery psychological assessments. However, several items may be measuring physical consequences of obesity (e.g., sleep disturbance, chronic pain, or sexual dysfunction) rather than depressive symptoms. Methods Bariatric surgery candidates (n=210) completed a series of assessments including the BDI, a chronic pain assessment, and a semistructured clinical interview. Total BDI scores, subscale scores, and endorsement patterns of somatic versus cognitive-affective items were examined based on (1) the presence or absence of a depressive diagnosis or (2) the presence or absence of chronic pain, and optimal cut points were determined. Results Both the total BDI and cognitive-affective subscale had good discriminating accuracy between participants with and without, depression, with an optimal cut point of 12 for the BDI and 7 for the cognitive-affective subscale. Bariatric surgery candidates with chronic pain had significantly higher mean total scores on the BDI (M=12.5±7.5) than those without chronic pain (M=9.02±6.7; p<0.01), and those with chronic pain were significantly more likely to endorse many of the physical items than those without chronic pain. Conclusions The BDI, with or without the somatic items, appears to be a reasonable screening measure for depressive symptoms among bariatric surgery candidates and the subpopulation of those with chronic pain, although future investigations may wish to examine whether other measures would have improved discrimination accuracy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)426-431
Number of pages6
JournalObesity Surgery
Volume20
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2010
Externally publishedYes

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Bariatric Surgery
Chronic Pain
Depression
Equipment and Supplies
Population
Pain Measurement
Sleep
Obesity
Interviews
Psychology

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

The utility of the beck depression inventory in a bariatric surgery population. / Krukowski, Rebecca; Friedman, Kelli E.; Applegate, Katherine L.

In: Obesity Surgery, Vol. 20, No. 4, 01.04.2010, p. 426-431.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Krukowski, Rebecca ; Friedman, Kelli E. ; Applegate, Katherine L. / The utility of the beck depression inventory in a bariatric surgery population. In: Obesity Surgery. 2010 ; Vol. 20, No. 4. pp. 426-431.
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