Therapeutics against influenza.

Elena A. Govorkova, Jonathan A. McCullers

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Despite 75 years of research into prevention and treatment of influenza, the viruses that cause this disease continue to rank as some of the most important pathogens afflicting humans today. Progress in development of therapeutics for influenza has been slow for much of that time, but has accelerated in pace over the last two decades. Two classes of antiviral medications are used in humans at present, but each has limitations in scope and effectiveness of use. New strategies involving these licensed agents, including alternate forms of delivery and combination therapy with other drugs, are currently being explored. In addition, several novel antiviral compounds are in various clinical phases of development. Together with strategies designed to target the virus itself, new approaches to interrupt host-pathogen interactions or modulate detrimental aspects of the immune response have been proposed. Therapy for influenza will likely undergo substantial changes in the decades to come, evolving with our knowledge of pathogenesis as new approaches become viable and are validated clinically.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)273-300
Number of pages28
JournalCurrent Topics in Microbiology and Immunology
Volume370
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Human Influenza
Antiviral Agents
Host-Pathogen Interactions
Virus Diseases
Orthomyxoviridae
Therapeutics
Viruses
Research
Pharmaceutical Preparations

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Immunology
  • Microbiology

Cite this

Therapeutics against influenza. / Govorkova, Elena A.; McCullers, Jonathan A.

In: Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology, Vol. 370, 2013, p. 273-300.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

@article{4437ddfd6ff940e897beb2de30495340,
title = "Therapeutics against influenza.",
abstract = "Despite 75 years of research into prevention and treatment of influenza, the viruses that cause this disease continue to rank as some of the most important pathogens afflicting humans today. Progress in development of therapeutics for influenza has been slow for much of that time, but has accelerated in pace over the last two decades. Two classes of antiviral medications are used in humans at present, but each has limitations in scope and effectiveness of use. New strategies involving these licensed agents, including alternate forms of delivery and combination therapy with other drugs, are currently being explored. In addition, several novel antiviral compounds are in various clinical phases of development. Together with strategies designed to target the virus itself, new approaches to interrupt host-pathogen interactions or modulate detrimental aspects of the immune response have been proposed. Therapy for influenza will likely undergo substantial changes in the decades to come, evolving with our knowledge of pathogenesis as new approaches become viable and are validated clinically.",
author = "Govorkova, {Elena A.} and McCullers, {Jonathan A.}",
year = "2013",
doi = "10.1007/82_2011_198",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "370",
pages = "273--300",
journal = "Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology",
issn = "0070-217X",
publisher = "Springer Verlag",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Therapeutics against influenza.

AU - Govorkova, Elena A.

AU - McCullers, Jonathan A.

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - Despite 75 years of research into prevention and treatment of influenza, the viruses that cause this disease continue to rank as some of the most important pathogens afflicting humans today. Progress in development of therapeutics for influenza has been slow for much of that time, but has accelerated in pace over the last two decades. Two classes of antiviral medications are used in humans at present, but each has limitations in scope and effectiveness of use. New strategies involving these licensed agents, including alternate forms of delivery and combination therapy with other drugs, are currently being explored. In addition, several novel antiviral compounds are in various clinical phases of development. Together with strategies designed to target the virus itself, new approaches to interrupt host-pathogen interactions or modulate detrimental aspects of the immune response have been proposed. Therapy for influenza will likely undergo substantial changes in the decades to come, evolving with our knowledge of pathogenesis as new approaches become viable and are validated clinically.

AB - Despite 75 years of research into prevention and treatment of influenza, the viruses that cause this disease continue to rank as some of the most important pathogens afflicting humans today. Progress in development of therapeutics for influenza has been slow for much of that time, but has accelerated in pace over the last two decades. Two classes of antiviral medications are used in humans at present, but each has limitations in scope and effectiveness of use. New strategies involving these licensed agents, including alternate forms of delivery and combination therapy with other drugs, are currently being explored. In addition, several novel antiviral compounds are in various clinical phases of development. Together with strategies designed to target the virus itself, new approaches to interrupt host-pathogen interactions or modulate detrimental aspects of the immune response have been proposed. Therapy for influenza will likely undergo substantial changes in the decades to come, evolving with our knowledge of pathogenesis as new approaches become viable and are validated clinically.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84879684099&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84879684099&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/82_2011_198

DO - 10.1007/82_2011_198

M3 - Review article

VL - 370

SP - 273

EP - 300

JO - Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology

JF - Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology

SN - 0070-217X

ER -