Thermal modulation of channel catfish intestinal dimensions, BBM fluidity, and glucose transport

Kristina L. Houpe, Christiane Malo, Philip B. Oldham, Randal Buddington

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In light of the direct influence of temperature on metabolic rates and dietary loads of ectotherms, intestinal responses were evaluated by measuring 1) dimensions, 2) transapical initial rates of transport using intact tissues and brush-border membrane vesicles (BBMV) and 3) BBMV fluidity using two size groups of channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) acclimated to different water temperatures. Intestines of larger fish at 15°C were 23% longer and 61% heavier than those at 30°C. Regardless of assay temperature, rates of glucose uptake by fish held at 30°C relative to those at 15°C were twofold higher for intact tissues and over fivefold higher for BBMV. Although rates of BBMV transport were higher for smaller fish, adaptive responses were greater for larger fish. Temperature coefficients (Q10s) for BBMV transport were higher between 5 and 15°C (3.5-4.5) relative to 15 to 35°C (1.9-2.0) and may be partly related to the inability of catfish held at low temperatures to adjust apical membrane fluidity. Our findings indicate that 1) cold-acclimated catfish maintain transport capacities by increasing intestinal dimensions, 2) high acclimation temperatures increase rates of uptake by as yet unknown mechanisms, 3) thermal modulation of transport varies among species and nutrients, and 4) adaptive responses of ectotherms are different from those of homeotherms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology
Volume270
Issue number5 39-5
StatePublished - Jun 25 1996

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Ictaluridae
Microvilli
Hot Temperature
Glucose
Temperature
Fishes
Transport Vesicles
Catfishes
Membrane Fluidity
Membranes
Acclimatization
Large Intestine
Food
Water

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Thermal modulation of channel catfish intestinal dimensions, BBM fluidity, and glucose transport. / Houpe, Kristina L.; Malo, Christiane; Oldham, Philip B.; Buddington, Randal.

In: American Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology, Vol. 270, No. 5 39-5, 25.06.1996.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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