Thermal stimulation causes tooth deformation

A possible alternative to the hydrodynamic theory?

Pairoj Linsuwanont, Antheunis Versluis, Joseph E. Palamara, Harold H. Messer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To investigate the relationship between temperature distribution and tooth structure deformation during and after localised application of thermal stimuli used during pulp vitality testing. Methods: Strains and temperature changes within tooth structures were recorded when three different thermal stimuli, namely heated gutta percha (120-140 °C), carbon dioxide dry ice (-72 °C) and refrigerant spray (-50 °C), were applied to extracted bovine incisors. Each stimulus was applied for 5 s on the labial enamel surface in a random order, with a 30-min interval between tests. Finite element analysis was performed on basic geometrical shapes to investigate structural deformation in relation to temperature change. Results: Application of thermal stimuli to the labial enamel surface resulted in rapid development of strain at the pulpal dentine surface before any temperature change was detected at the dentino-enamel junction. The strain pattern was biphasic; heat produced an initial contraction of the pulpal surface, followed by an expansion, and the reverse pattern was found with cold stimulation. Finite element analysis confirmed that the initially pronounced thermal gradient across the enamel and dentine caused rapid flexural deformation before temperature changes reached the dentino-enamel junction. When the temperature changes reached the pulpal dentine and thus reduced the thermal gradient, the direction of the strain was reversed. Conclusion: These results indicate possible alternatives to the hydrodynamic theory for thermal stimuli applied to intact teeth. Mechanically induced dentine deformation may trigger nerve impulses directly, or may exert mechanically induced dentinal fluid flow that triggers nerve activity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)261-272
Number of pages12
JournalArchives of Oral Biology
Volume53
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2008
Externally publishedYes

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Hydrodynamics
Tooth
Hot Temperature
Dental Enamel
Dentin
Temperature
Finite Element Analysis
Lip
Dentinal Fluid
Dry Ice
Gutta-Percha
Incisor
Carbon Dioxide
Action Potentials

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Dentistry(all)
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Thermal stimulation causes tooth deformation : A possible alternative to the hydrodynamic theory? / Linsuwanont, Pairoj; Versluis, Antheunis; Palamara, Joseph E.; Messer, Harold H.

In: Archives of Oral Biology, Vol. 53, No. 3, 01.03.2008, p. 261-272.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Linsuwanont, Pairoj ; Versluis, Antheunis ; Palamara, Joseph E. ; Messer, Harold H. / Thermal stimulation causes tooth deformation : A possible alternative to the hydrodynamic theory?. In: Archives of Oral Biology. 2008 ; Vol. 53, No. 3. pp. 261-272.
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