Three-dimensional myocardial and ventricular shape

A surface representation

J. S. Janicki, Karl Weber, R. F. Gochman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To date, a detailed three-dimensional (3D) analysis of cardiac shape and size has not been available. Accordingly, we developed a method for such an analysis using sectioning hearts and a computer-based 3D description of the ep- and endocardial surfaces of the left and right ventricles (LV-RV) and the interventricular septum. The accuracy of this analysis as a function of section thickness (h(s)) was evaluated and reference axes for the LV, RV, and myocardium determined in eight canine hearts. After diastolic arrest, the RV, LV, and their atria were fixed in formaldehyde solution at pressures of 6 and 12 cmH2O, respectively. The hearts were then cast (plastic or gelatin) and sectioned, and the surfaces were digitized. We found that 1) accurate 3D computer reconstructions and computed volumes of the LV, RV, and myocardium were obtained when H(s) ≤ 5 mm, 2) the apex-to-base circumference and cross-sectional area relations could be approximated provided h(s) < 10 mm, and 3) the section centers of gravity for the LV, RV, and myocardium defined three distinct vertical lines. Thus, an accurate description of 3D configuration is obtainable by a 5-mm section thickness. The centers of gravity provide a set of geometrical reference for the study of shape in normal and diseased hearts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology
Volume10
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1 1981
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Myocardium
Gravitation
Heart Ventricles
Surgical Casts
Gelatin
Formaldehyde
Canidae
Heart Diseases
Pressure

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Three-dimensional myocardial and ventricular shape : A surface representation. / Janicki, J. S.; Weber, Karl; Gochman, R. F.

In: American Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology, Vol. 10, No. 1, 01.01.1981.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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