Thrombophilia screening

Lori B. Hornsby, Emily M. Armstrong, Jessica M. Bellone, Sarah Eudaley, Haley M. Phillippe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although controversial, screening for thrombophilia has become common. Testing for antiphospholipid antibodies is indicated in order to guide treatment decisions if there is clinical suspicion for antiphospholipid syndrome. The utility of identifying other thrombophilias in symptomatic venous thromboembolism (VTE) is questionable, as the risk of recurrence does not appear to be increased by an appreciable degree with the most common disorders (heterozygosity for factor V Leiden or prothrombin mutation). Although recurrence appears to be increased in those with homozygous or multiple abnormalities and potentially deficiencies in natural anticoagulants, screening to detect these conditions is difficult to justify based on their rarity. The American College of Chest Physicians' current guidelines note the increased risk of recurrence with idiopathic, proximal events regardless of thrombophilia status. They suggest duration of anticoagulation therapy be based on location and provoking factors rather than whether or not the individual has a thrombophilia. Because routine prophylaxis in asymptomatic individuals with thrombophilia is not recommended, screening of asymptomatic family members is difficult to justify. Screening prior to prescribing combination oral contraceptives is not cost effective, may result in unwanted pregnancies, and may have little effect on the overall rate of VTE.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)253-259
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Pharmacy Practice
Volume27
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

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Thrombophilia
Venous Thromboembolism
Recurrence
Unwanted Pregnancies
Multiple Abnormalities
Antiphospholipid Antibodies
Antiphospholipid Syndrome
Prothrombin
Oral Contraceptives
Anticoagulants
Guidelines
Costs and Cost Analysis
Mutation
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Hornsby, L. B., Armstrong, E. M., Bellone, J. M., Eudaley, S., & Phillippe, H. M. (2014). Thrombophilia screening. Journal of Pharmacy Practice, 27(3), 253-259. https://doi.org/10.1177/0897190014530426

Thrombophilia screening. / Hornsby, Lori B.; Armstrong, Emily M.; Bellone, Jessica M.; Eudaley, Sarah; Phillippe, Haley M.

In: Journal of Pharmacy Practice, Vol. 27, No. 3, 01.01.2014, p. 253-259.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hornsby, LB, Armstrong, EM, Bellone, JM, Eudaley, S & Phillippe, HM 2014, 'Thrombophilia screening', Journal of Pharmacy Practice, vol. 27, no. 3, pp. 253-259. https://doi.org/10.1177/0897190014530426
Hornsby LB, Armstrong EM, Bellone JM, Eudaley S, Phillippe HM. Thrombophilia screening. Journal of Pharmacy Practice. 2014 Jan 1;27(3):253-259. https://doi.org/10.1177/0897190014530426
Hornsby, Lori B. ; Armstrong, Emily M. ; Bellone, Jessica M. ; Eudaley, Sarah ; Phillippe, Haley M. / Thrombophilia screening. In: Journal of Pharmacy Practice. 2014 ; Vol. 27, No. 3. pp. 253-259.
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