Time-dependent diffuse reflectance spectroscopy for in vivo characterization of pediatric epileptogenic brain lesions

Sanghoon Oh, John Ragheb, Sanjiv Bhatia, David Sandberg, Mahlon Johnson, Bradley Fernald, Wei Chiang Lin

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Optical spectroscopy for in vivo tissue diagnosis is performed traditionally in a static manner; a snap shot of the tissue biochemical and morphological characteristics is captured through the interaction between light and the tissue. This approach does not capture the dynamic nature of a living organ, which is critical to the studies of brain disorders such as epilepsy. Therefore, a time-dependent diffuse reflectance spectroscopy system with a fiber-optic probe was designed and developed. The system was designed to acquire broadband diffuse reflectance spectra (240 ~ 932 nm) at an acquisition rate of 33 Hz. The broadband spectral acquisition feature allows simultaneous monitoring of various physiological characteristics of tissues. The utility of such a system in guiding pediatric epilepsy surgery was tested in a pilot clinical study including 13 epilepsy patients and seven brain tumor patients. The control patients were children undergoing suregery for brain tumors in which measurements were taken from normal brain exposed during the surgery. Diffuse reflectance spectra were acquired for 12 seconds from various parts of the brain of the patients during surgery. Recorded spectra were processed and analyzed in both spectral and time domains to gain insights into the dynamic changes in, for example, hemodynamics of the investigated brain tissue. One finding from this pilot study is that unsynchronized alterations in local blood oxygenation and local blood volume were observed in epileptogenic cortex. These study results suggest the advantage of using a time-dependent diffuse reflectance spectroscopy system to study epileptogenic brain in vivo.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProgress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE
Volume6842
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 21 2008
Externally publishedYes
EventPhotonic Therapeutics and Diagnostics IV - San Jose, CA, United States
Duration: Jan 19 2008Jan 19 2008

Other

OtherPhotonic Therapeutics and Diagnostics IV
CountryUnited States
CitySan Jose, CA
Period1/19/081/19/08

Fingerprint

Pediatrics
lesions
brain
Brain
Spectrum Analysis
Spectroscopy
reflectance
epilepsy
Epilepsy
Tissue
spectroscopy
surgery
Surgery
Brain Neoplasms
Tumors
acquisition
Blood
tumors
Physiologic Monitoring
Brain Diseases

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
  • Biomaterials
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Oh, S., Ragheb, J., Bhatia, S., Sandberg, D., Johnson, M., Fernald, B., & Lin, W. C. (2008). Time-dependent diffuse reflectance spectroscopy for in vivo characterization of pediatric epileptogenic brain lesions. In Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE (Vol. 6842). [68422M] https://doi.org/10.1117/12.763407

Time-dependent diffuse reflectance spectroscopy for in vivo characterization of pediatric epileptogenic brain lesions. / Oh, Sanghoon; Ragheb, John; Bhatia, Sanjiv; Sandberg, David; Johnson, Mahlon; Fernald, Bradley; Lin, Wei Chiang.

Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. Vol. 6842 2008. 68422M.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Oh, S, Ragheb, J, Bhatia, S, Sandberg, D, Johnson, M, Fernald, B & Lin, WC 2008, Time-dependent diffuse reflectance spectroscopy for in vivo characterization of pediatric epileptogenic brain lesions. in Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. vol. 6842, 68422M, Photonic Therapeutics and Diagnostics IV, San Jose, CA, United States, 1/19/08. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.763407
Oh S, Ragheb J, Bhatia S, Sandberg D, Johnson M, Fernald B et al. Time-dependent diffuse reflectance spectroscopy for in vivo characterization of pediatric epileptogenic brain lesions. In Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. Vol. 6842. 2008. 68422M https://doi.org/10.1117/12.763407
Oh, Sanghoon ; Ragheb, John ; Bhatia, Sanjiv ; Sandberg, David ; Johnson, Mahlon ; Fernald, Bradley ; Lin, Wei Chiang. / Time-dependent diffuse reflectance spectroscopy for in vivo characterization of pediatric epileptogenic brain lesions. Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. Vol. 6842 2008.
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