To what extent is blood a reasonable surrogate for brain in gene expression studies

Estimation from mouse hippocampus and spleen

Matthew N. Davies, Sarah Lawn, Steven Whatley, Cathy Fernandes, Robert Williams, Leonard C. Schalkwyk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Microarrays are designed to measure genome-wide differences in gene expression. In cases where a tissue is not accessible for analysis (e.g. human brain), it is of interest to determine whether a second, accessible tissue could be used as a surrogate for transcription profiling. Surrogacy has applications in the study of behavioural and neurodegenerative disorders. Comparison between hippocampus and spleen mRNA obtained from a mouse recombinant inbred panel indicates a high degree of correlation between the tissues for genes that display a high heritability of expression level. This correlation is not limited to apparent expression differences caused by sequence polymorphisms in the target sequences and includes both cis and trans genetic effects. A tissue such as blood could therefore give surrogate information on expression in brain for a subset of genes, in particular those co-expressed between the two tissues, which have heritably varying expression.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number54
JournalFrontiers in Neuroscience
Volume1
Issue numberOCT
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2009

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Hippocampus
Spleen
Gene Expression
Brain
Neurodegenerative Diseases
Genes
Genome
Messenger RNA

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

To what extent is blood a reasonable surrogate for brain in gene expression studies : Estimation from mouse hippocampus and spleen. / Davies, Matthew N.; Lawn, Sarah; Whatley, Steven; Fernandes, Cathy; Williams, Robert; Schalkwyk, Leonard C.

In: Frontiers in Neuroscience, Vol. 1, No. OCT, 54, 01.12.2009.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Davies, Matthew N. ; Lawn, Sarah ; Whatley, Steven ; Fernandes, Cathy ; Williams, Robert ; Schalkwyk, Leonard C. / To what extent is blood a reasonable surrogate for brain in gene expression studies : Estimation from mouse hippocampus and spleen. In: Frontiers in Neuroscience. 2009 ; Vol. 1, No. OCT.
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