Tobacco Use Among Siblings of Childhood Cancer Survivors

A Report From the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study

David Buchbinder, Kevin Oeffinger, Conrado Franco-Villalobos, Yutaka Yasui, Melissa A. Alderfer, Gregory Armstrong, Jacqueline Casillas, Jennifer Ford, Kevin R. Krull, Wendy Leisenring, Christopher Recklitis, Leslie L. Robison, Lonnie K. Zeltzer, E. Anne Lown

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Having a brother or sister with childhood cancer may influence health behaviors during adulthood. The aim of this study was to compare tobacco use in siblings of survivors with peers and to identify factors associated with sibling tobacco use. Procedures: A retrospective cohort study was conducted using adult siblings (N = 1,974) of 5+ year cancer survivors in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS) and participants (N = 24,105, weighted to match CCSS) in the 2007 National Health Interview Survey. Self-reported tobacco use, sociodemographic, and cancer-related risk factors were analyzed. Results: Siblings were equally likely to have ever smoked compared to their peers (odds ratio [OR] 1.02, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.93–1.12). Siblings were less likely to be current smokers (OR 0.83, 95%CI 0.73–0.94), but more likely to be former smokers (OR 1.21, 95%CI 1.08–1.35). Siblings with low education were more likely to ever smoke (OR 1.51, 95%CI 1.15–2.00) and be current smokers (OR 1.67, 95%CI 1.24–2.26) compared to their peers. Among siblings, risk factors for current tobacco use included the following: low income <$20,000 (OR 1.66, 95%CI 1.09–2.54), low education (OR 6.68, 95%CI 4.07–10.97), psychological distress (OR 5.36, 95%CI 2.21–13.02), and heavy alcohol use (OR 3.68, 95%CI 2.50–5.41). Conclusions: Siblings of survivors take up smoking at similar rates to their peers, but are more likely to quit. Efforts are needed to address disparities by providing greater psychosocial support and education for the lowest socioeconomic status families facing childhood cancer. Pediatr Blood Cancer 2015; 9999:XX–XX

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)326-333
Number of pages8
JournalPediatric Blood and Cancer
Volume63
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2016

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Tobacco Use
Survivors
Siblings
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Neoplasms
Education
Health Behavior
Health Surveys
Social Class
Smoke
Cohort Studies
Retrospective Studies
Smoking
Alcohols
Interviews
Psychology

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Hematology
  • Oncology

Cite this

Buchbinder, D., Oeffinger, K., Franco-Villalobos, C., Yasui, Y., Alderfer, M. A., Armstrong, G., ... Lown, E. A. (2016). Tobacco Use Among Siblings of Childhood Cancer Survivors: A Report From the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study. Pediatric Blood and Cancer, 63(2), 326-333. https://doi.org/10.1002/pbc.25719

Tobacco Use Among Siblings of Childhood Cancer Survivors : A Report From the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study. / Buchbinder, David; Oeffinger, Kevin; Franco-Villalobos, Conrado; Yasui, Yutaka; Alderfer, Melissa A.; Armstrong, Gregory; Casillas, Jacqueline; Ford, Jennifer; Krull, Kevin R.; Leisenring, Wendy; Recklitis, Christopher; Robison, Leslie L.; Zeltzer, Lonnie K.; Lown, E. Anne.

In: Pediatric Blood and Cancer, Vol. 63, No. 2, 01.02.2016, p. 326-333.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Buchbinder, D, Oeffinger, K, Franco-Villalobos, C, Yasui, Y, Alderfer, MA, Armstrong, G, Casillas, J, Ford, J, Krull, KR, Leisenring, W, Recklitis, C, Robison, LL, Zeltzer, LK & Lown, EA 2016, 'Tobacco Use Among Siblings of Childhood Cancer Survivors: A Report From the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study', Pediatric Blood and Cancer, vol. 63, no. 2, pp. 326-333. https://doi.org/10.1002/pbc.25719
Buchbinder, David ; Oeffinger, Kevin ; Franco-Villalobos, Conrado ; Yasui, Yutaka ; Alderfer, Melissa A. ; Armstrong, Gregory ; Casillas, Jacqueline ; Ford, Jennifer ; Krull, Kevin R. ; Leisenring, Wendy ; Recklitis, Christopher ; Robison, Leslie L. ; Zeltzer, Lonnie K. ; Lown, E. Anne. / Tobacco Use Among Siblings of Childhood Cancer Survivors : A Report From the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study. In: Pediatric Blood and Cancer. 2016 ; Vol. 63, No. 2. pp. 326-333.
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abstract = "Background: Having a brother or sister with childhood cancer may influence health behaviors during adulthood. The aim of this study was to compare tobacco use in siblings of survivors with peers and to identify factors associated with sibling tobacco use. Procedures: A retrospective cohort study was conducted using adult siblings (N = 1,974) of 5+ year cancer survivors in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS) and participants (N = 24,105, weighted to match CCSS) in the 2007 National Health Interview Survey. Self-reported tobacco use, sociodemographic, and cancer-related risk factors were analyzed. Results: Siblings were equally likely to have ever smoked compared to their peers (odds ratio [OR] 1.02, 95{\%} confidence interval [CI] 0.93–1.12). Siblings were less likely to be current smokers (OR 0.83, 95{\%}CI 0.73–0.94), but more likely to be former smokers (OR 1.21, 95{\%}CI 1.08–1.35). Siblings with low education were more likely to ever smoke (OR 1.51, 95{\%}CI 1.15–2.00) and be current smokers (OR 1.67, 95{\%}CI 1.24–2.26) compared to their peers. Among siblings, risk factors for current tobacco use included the following: low income <$20,000 (OR 1.66, 95{\%}CI 1.09–2.54), low education (OR 6.68, 95{\%}CI 4.07–10.97), psychological distress (OR 5.36, 95{\%}CI 2.21–13.02), and heavy alcohol use (OR 3.68, 95{\%}CI 2.50–5.41). Conclusions: Siblings of survivors take up smoking at similar rates to their peers, but are more likely to quit. Efforts are needed to address disparities by providing greater psychosocial support and education for the lowest socioeconomic status families facing childhood cancer. Pediatr Blood Cancer 2015; 9999:XX–XX",
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AU - Yasui, Yutaka

AU - Alderfer, Melissa A.

AU - Armstrong, Gregory

AU - Casillas, Jacqueline

AU - Ford, Jennifer

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N2 - Background: Having a brother or sister with childhood cancer may influence health behaviors during adulthood. The aim of this study was to compare tobacco use in siblings of survivors with peers and to identify factors associated with sibling tobacco use. Procedures: A retrospective cohort study was conducted using adult siblings (N = 1,974) of 5+ year cancer survivors in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS) and participants (N = 24,105, weighted to match CCSS) in the 2007 National Health Interview Survey. Self-reported tobacco use, sociodemographic, and cancer-related risk factors were analyzed. Results: Siblings were equally likely to have ever smoked compared to their peers (odds ratio [OR] 1.02, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.93–1.12). Siblings were less likely to be current smokers (OR 0.83, 95%CI 0.73–0.94), but more likely to be former smokers (OR 1.21, 95%CI 1.08–1.35). Siblings with low education were more likely to ever smoke (OR 1.51, 95%CI 1.15–2.00) and be current smokers (OR 1.67, 95%CI 1.24–2.26) compared to their peers. Among siblings, risk factors for current tobacco use included the following: low income <$20,000 (OR 1.66, 95%CI 1.09–2.54), low education (OR 6.68, 95%CI 4.07–10.97), psychological distress (OR 5.36, 95%CI 2.21–13.02), and heavy alcohol use (OR 3.68, 95%CI 2.50–5.41). Conclusions: Siblings of survivors take up smoking at similar rates to their peers, but are more likely to quit. Efforts are needed to address disparities by providing greater psychosocial support and education for the lowest socioeconomic status families facing childhood cancer. Pediatr Blood Cancer 2015; 9999:XX–XX

AB - Background: Having a brother or sister with childhood cancer may influence health behaviors during adulthood. The aim of this study was to compare tobacco use in siblings of survivors with peers and to identify factors associated with sibling tobacco use. Procedures: A retrospective cohort study was conducted using adult siblings (N = 1,974) of 5+ year cancer survivors in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS) and participants (N = 24,105, weighted to match CCSS) in the 2007 National Health Interview Survey. Self-reported tobacco use, sociodemographic, and cancer-related risk factors were analyzed. Results: Siblings were equally likely to have ever smoked compared to their peers (odds ratio [OR] 1.02, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.93–1.12). Siblings were less likely to be current smokers (OR 0.83, 95%CI 0.73–0.94), but more likely to be former smokers (OR 1.21, 95%CI 1.08–1.35). Siblings with low education were more likely to ever smoke (OR 1.51, 95%CI 1.15–2.00) and be current smokers (OR 1.67, 95%CI 1.24–2.26) compared to their peers. Among siblings, risk factors for current tobacco use included the following: low income <$20,000 (OR 1.66, 95%CI 1.09–2.54), low education (OR 6.68, 95%CI 4.07–10.97), psychological distress (OR 5.36, 95%CI 2.21–13.02), and heavy alcohol use (OR 3.68, 95%CI 2.50–5.41). Conclusions: Siblings of survivors take up smoking at similar rates to their peers, but are more likely to quit. Efforts are needed to address disparities by providing greater psychosocial support and education for the lowest socioeconomic status families facing childhood cancer. Pediatr Blood Cancer 2015; 9999:XX–XX

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