Total mesh wrapping for parenchymal liver injuries—a combined experimental and clinical study

Scott Stevens, Kimball I. Maull, Blaine Enderson, John N. Meadors, Louis W. Elkins, Fred M. Hopkins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined a mesh wrap technique that provides effective hepatic tamponade and clinical experience with the technique in 6 patients is reported. Technical feasibility and effectiveness were investigated in 8 miniature swine. The animals were divided into two groups: group A (n = 4), control animals; stellate liver lacerations without mesh wrap or other measures for hemostasis, and group B (n = 4); stellate liver laceration with synthetic absorbable mesh wrap applied for hepatic hemostasis. Except for mesh application, all variables were held constant for both groups. All animals in the-control group died within 20 to 120 minutes (mean: 65 minutes). All animals in group B survived (p = 0.029). The livers were harvested for gross and microscopic examinations. No abscess, bile leak, or hematoma was noted. Clinically, total mesh wrapping was attempted in 6 patients with blunt exsanguinating liver injuries. The technique failed intraoperatively in two patients with juxtacaval lacerations and hepatic vein avulsion injuries. One patient with a bilobar gunshot wound died later of sepsis. In three patients with bursting injuries, the technique successfully controlled bleeding and resulted in long-term survival. In conclusion, the total hepatic mesh wrap (1) is geometrically, technically, and mechanically feasible, (2) was not associated with complications in this series, and (3) can effectively secure hemostasis following parenchymal liver injury.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1103-1109
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care
Volume31
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1991

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Liver
Lacerations
Hemostasis
Wounds and Injuries
Miniature Swine
Gunshot Wounds
Hepatic Veins
Clinical Studies
Bile
Hematoma
Abscess
Sepsis
Hemorrhage
Control Groups
Survival

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

Total mesh wrapping for parenchymal liver injuries—a combined experimental and clinical study. / Stevens, Scott; Maull, Kimball I.; Enderson, Blaine; Meadors, John N.; Elkins, Louis W.; Hopkins, Fred M.

In: Journal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care, Vol. 31, No. 8, 01.01.1991, p. 1103-1109.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Stevens, Scott ; Maull, Kimball I. ; Enderson, Blaine ; Meadors, John N. ; Elkins, Louis W. ; Hopkins, Fred M. / Total mesh wrapping for parenchymal liver injuries—a combined experimental and clinical study. In: Journal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care. 1991 ; Vol. 31, No. 8. pp. 1103-1109.
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