Touchscreen tasks in mice to demonstrate differences between hippocampal and striatal functions

David Delotterie, Chantal Mathis, Jean Christophe Cassel, Holger Rosenbrock, Cornelia Dorner-Ciossek, Anelise Marti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In mammals, hippocampal and striatal regions are engaged in separable cognitive processes usually assessed through species-specific paradigms. To reconcile cognitive testing among species, translational advantages of the touchscreen-based automated method have been recently promoted. However, it remains undetermined whether similar neural substrates would be involved in such behavioral tasks both in humans and rodents. To address this question, the effects of hippocampal or dorso-striatal fiber-sparing lesions were first assessed in mice through a battery of tasks (experiment A) comprising the acquisition of two touchscreen paradigms, the Paired Associates Learning (dPAL) and Visuo-Motor Conditional Learning (VMCL) tasks, and a more classical T-maze alternation task. Additionally, we sought to determine whether post-acquisition hippocampal lesions would alter memory retrieval in the dPAL task (experiment B). Pre-training lesions of dorsal striatum caused major impairments in all paradigms. In contrast, pre-training hippocampal lesions disrupted the performance of animals trained in the T-maze assay, but spared the acquisition in touchscreen tasks. Nonetheless, post-training hippocampal lesions severely impacted the recall of the previously learned dPAL task. Altogether, our data show that, after having demonstrated their potential in genetically modified mice, touchscreens also reveal perfectly adapted to taxing functional implications of brain structures in mice by means of lesion approaches. Unlike its human counterpart requiring an intact hippocampus, the acquisition of the dPAL task requires the integrity of the dorsal striatum in mice. The hippocampus only later intervenes, when acquired information needs to be retrieved. Touchscreen assays may therefore be suited to study striatal- or hippocampal-dependent forms of learnings in mice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)16-27
Number of pages12
JournalNeurobiology of Learning and Memory
Volume120
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2015

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Corpus Striatum
Hippocampus
Paired-Associate Learning
Learning
Mammals
Rodentia
Brain

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

Touchscreen tasks in mice to demonstrate differences between hippocampal and striatal functions. / Delotterie, David; Mathis, Chantal; Cassel, Jean Christophe; Rosenbrock, Holger; Dorner-Ciossek, Cornelia; Marti, Anelise.

In: Neurobiology of Learning and Memory, Vol. 120, 01.04.2015, p. 16-27.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Delotterie, David ; Mathis, Chantal ; Cassel, Jean Christophe ; Rosenbrock, Holger ; Dorner-Ciossek, Cornelia ; Marti, Anelise. / Touchscreen tasks in mice to demonstrate differences between hippocampal and striatal functions. In: Neurobiology of Learning and Memory. 2015 ; Vol. 120. pp. 16-27.
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