Toward understanding the natural history of olfactory groove meningiomas

Mitesh V. Shah, William Snyder, Edward C. Weisberger, Robert L. Campbell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To present the pattern of recurrence of olfactory groove meningiomas after surgical resection and present suggested follow-up of patients in the MRI era. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of four patients with surgically resected olfactory groove meningiomas who presented with tumor recurrence (between 1984-1994) was carried out. Results: The review included oneF and threeM with olfactory groove meningiomas who later presented with recurrent tumors. The mean age at initial diagnosis was 47 yrs (range 21-74), and mean duration of symptoms prior to diagnosis was 1.1 years. All presented with vision changes, loss of smell, memory dysfunction, and personality changes. Three of the patients had preop MRI. All patients had a craniotomy, with gross total resection achieved in three patients, and 90% resection in the fourth patient. Three patients were followed with routing contrast head CT scans postop, none were followed with MRI. The time to recurrence ranged from 2.25 yrs to 10 yrs (mean= 6 yrs). Three of the patients presented with recurrent visual deterioration, and one presented with headaches and nasal obstruction. Postop CT scans failed to document early tumor recurrence, while MRI documented tumor recurrence in all patients. Tumor resection and optic nerve decompression improved vision in two patients and stabilized vision in two. Complete resection was not possible due to extensive bony involvement inferior to the anterior cranial Fossa in all cases. Conclusion: Long-term follow-up of four patients with recurrent growth of olfactory groove meningiomas revealed the epicenter of the recurrence to be inferior to the anterior cranial fossa, leading to visual deterioration. This location led to a delay in diagnosis in patients who were followed only with routine CT scans and without routine formal ophthalmologic evaluations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Number of pages1
JournalSkull Base Surgery
Volume8
Issue numberSUPPL. 1
StatePublished - Dec 1 1998

Fingerprint

Meningioma
Recurrence
Anterior Cranial Fossa
Neoplasms
Nasal Obstruction
Smell
Craniotomy
Memory Disorders
Optic Nerve
Decompression
Headache
Personality
Head

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Shah, M. V., Snyder, W., Weisberger, E. C., & Campbell, R. L. (1998). Toward understanding the natural history of olfactory groove meningiomas. Skull Base Surgery, 8(SUPPL. 1).

Toward understanding the natural history of olfactory groove meningiomas. / Shah, Mitesh V.; Snyder, William; Weisberger, Edward C.; Campbell, Robert L.

In: Skull Base Surgery, Vol. 8, No. SUPPL. 1, 01.12.1998.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shah, MV, Snyder, W, Weisberger, EC & Campbell, RL 1998, 'Toward understanding the natural history of olfactory groove meningiomas', Skull Base Surgery, vol. 8, no. SUPPL. 1.
Shah, Mitesh V. ; Snyder, William ; Weisberger, Edward C. ; Campbell, Robert L. / Toward understanding the natural history of olfactory groove meningiomas. In: Skull Base Surgery. 1998 ; Vol. 8, No. SUPPL. 1.
@article{cd5011cad7a849f3a093d99495ad71c9,
title = "Toward understanding the natural history of olfactory groove meningiomas",
abstract = "Objective: To present the pattern of recurrence of olfactory groove meningiomas after surgical resection and present suggested follow-up of patients in the MRI era. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of four patients with surgically resected olfactory groove meningiomas who presented with tumor recurrence (between 1984-1994) was carried out. Results: The review included oneF and threeM with olfactory groove meningiomas who later presented with recurrent tumors. The mean age at initial diagnosis was 47 yrs (range 21-74), and mean duration of symptoms prior to diagnosis was 1.1 years. All presented with vision changes, loss of smell, memory dysfunction, and personality changes. Three of the patients had preop MRI. All patients had a craniotomy, with gross total resection achieved in three patients, and 90{\%} resection in the fourth patient. Three patients were followed with routing contrast head CT scans postop, none were followed with MRI. The time to recurrence ranged from 2.25 yrs to 10 yrs (mean= 6 yrs). Three of the patients presented with recurrent visual deterioration, and one presented with headaches and nasal obstruction. Postop CT scans failed to document early tumor recurrence, while MRI documented tumor recurrence in all patients. Tumor resection and optic nerve decompression improved vision in two patients and stabilized vision in two. Complete resection was not possible due to extensive bony involvement inferior to the anterior cranial Fossa in all cases. Conclusion: Long-term follow-up of four patients with recurrent growth of olfactory groove meningiomas revealed the epicenter of the recurrence to be inferior to the anterior cranial fossa, leading to visual deterioration. This location led to a delay in diagnosis in patients who were followed only with routine CT scans and without routine formal ophthalmologic evaluations.",
author = "Shah, {Mitesh V.} and William Snyder and Weisberger, {Edward C.} and Campbell, {Robert L.}",
year = "1998",
month = "12",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "8",
journal = "Journal of Neurological Surgery, Part B: Skull Base",
issn = "2193-6331",
publisher = "Thieme Medical Publishers",
number = "SUPPL. 1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Toward understanding the natural history of olfactory groove meningiomas

AU - Shah, Mitesh V.

AU - Snyder, William

AU - Weisberger, Edward C.

AU - Campbell, Robert L.

PY - 1998/12/1

Y1 - 1998/12/1

N2 - Objective: To present the pattern of recurrence of olfactory groove meningiomas after surgical resection and present suggested follow-up of patients in the MRI era. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of four patients with surgically resected olfactory groove meningiomas who presented with tumor recurrence (between 1984-1994) was carried out. Results: The review included oneF and threeM with olfactory groove meningiomas who later presented with recurrent tumors. The mean age at initial diagnosis was 47 yrs (range 21-74), and mean duration of symptoms prior to diagnosis was 1.1 years. All presented with vision changes, loss of smell, memory dysfunction, and personality changes. Three of the patients had preop MRI. All patients had a craniotomy, with gross total resection achieved in three patients, and 90% resection in the fourth patient. Three patients were followed with routing contrast head CT scans postop, none were followed with MRI. The time to recurrence ranged from 2.25 yrs to 10 yrs (mean= 6 yrs). Three of the patients presented with recurrent visual deterioration, and one presented with headaches and nasal obstruction. Postop CT scans failed to document early tumor recurrence, while MRI documented tumor recurrence in all patients. Tumor resection and optic nerve decompression improved vision in two patients and stabilized vision in two. Complete resection was not possible due to extensive bony involvement inferior to the anterior cranial Fossa in all cases. Conclusion: Long-term follow-up of four patients with recurrent growth of olfactory groove meningiomas revealed the epicenter of the recurrence to be inferior to the anterior cranial fossa, leading to visual deterioration. This location led to a delay in diagnosis in patients who were followed only with routine CT scans and without routine formal ophthalmologic evaluations.

AB - Objective: To present the pattern of recurrence of olfactory groove meningiomas after surgical resection and present suggested follow-up of patients in the MRI era. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of four patients with surgically resected olfactory groove meningiomas who presented with tumor recurrence (between 1984-1994) was carried out. Results: The review included oneF and threeM with olfactory groove meningiomas who later presented with recurrent tumors. The mean age at initial diagnosis was 47 yrs (range 21-74), and mean duration of symptoms prior to diagnosis was 1.1 years. All presented with vision changes, loss of smell, memory dysfunction, and personality changes. Three of the patients had preop MRI. All patients had a craniotomy, with gross total resection achieved in three patients, and 90% resection in the fourth patient. Three patients were followed with routing contrast head CT scans postop, none were followed with MRI. The time to recurrence ranged from 2.25 yrs to 10 yrs (mean= 6 yrs). Three of the patients presented with recurrent visual deterioration, and one presented with headaches and nasal obstruction. Postop CT scans failed to document early tumor recurrence, while MRI documented tumor recurrence in all patients. Tumor resection and optic nerve decompression improved vision in two patients and stabilized vision in two. Complete resection was not possible due to extensive bony involvement inferior to the anterior cranial Fossa in all cases. Conclusion: Long-term follow-up of four patients with recurrent growth of olfactory groove meningiomas revealed the epicenter of the recurrence to be inferior to the anterior cranial fossa, leading to visual deterioration. This location led to a delay in diagnosis in patients who were followed only with routine CT scans and without routine formal ophthalmologic evaluations.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33747765504&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33747765504&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 8

JO - Journal of Neurological Surgery, Part B: Skull Base

JF - Journal of Neurological Surgery, Part B: Skull Base

SN - 2193-6331

IS - SUPPL. 1

ER -