Tracheobronchial injury in the setting of an esophagectomy for cancer

Postoperative discovery a bad omen

Vadim P. Koshenkov, Danny Yakoub, Alan S. Livingstone, Dido Franceschi

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background A tracheobronchial injury is an uncommon complication of an esophagectomy. Differences in outcomes may exist for patients with injuries detected intraoperatively and postoperatively. Methods A retrospective review was performed for patients who underwent an esophagectomy for cancer at Jackson Memorial Hospital/University of Miami from January 2000 to June 2012. Results An injury to the tracheobronchial tree occurred in 7 of 425 patients (1.6%). The majority of the operations were performed via a transhiatal approach (87.8%). Patients with airway injuries were older (median 73 vs. 63), more likely to have squamous cell carcinoma (85.7% vs. 17.9%), and with proximal tumors (85.7% vs. 14.1%). When given, the type of neoadjuvant treatment consisted of chemoradiotherapy in all patients who suffered an injury, whereas it was only administered to 21.3% of patients without an injury. There were no deaths among three patients in whom the injury was identified intraoperatively. Mortality occurred in three of four patients (75.0%) with an injury detected postoperatively. Conclusions Patients with proximal tumors and radiation administration as a component of neoadjuvant treatment are more likely to suffer a tracheobronchial injury. An aggressive reoperative approach is warranted in patients with injuries that are discovered postoperatively.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)804-807
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Surgical Oncology
Volume109
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

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Esophagectomy
Wounds and Injuries
Neoplasms
Neoadjuvant Therapy
Chemoradiotherapy
Squamous Cell Carcinoma
Radiation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Oncology

Cite this

Tracheobronchial injury in the setting of an esophagectomy for cancer : Postoperative discovery a bad omen. / Koshenkov, Vadim P.; Yakoub, Danny; Livingstone, Alan S.; Franceschi, Dido.

In: Journal of Surgical Oncology, Vol. 109, No. 8, 01.01.2014, p. 804-807.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Koshenkov, Vadim P. ; Yakoub, Danny ; Livingstone, Alan S. ; Franceschi, Dido. / Tracheobronchial injury in the setting of an esophagectomy for cancer : Postoperative discovery a bad omen. In: Journal of Surgical Oncology. 2014 ; Vol. 109, No. 8. pp. 804-807.
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abstract = "Background A tracheobronchial injury is an uncommon complication of an esophagectomy. Differences in outcomes may exist for patients with injuries detected intraoperatively and postoperatively. Methods A retrospective review was performed for patients who underwent an esophagectomy for cancer at Jackson Memorial Hospital/University of Miami from January 2000 to June 2012. Results An injury to the tracheobronchial tree occurred in 7 of 425 patients (1.6{\%}). The majority of the operations were performed via a transhiatal approach (87.8{\%}). Patients with airway injuries were older (median 73 vs. 63), more likely to have squamous cell carcinoma (85.7{\%} vs. 17.9{\%}), and with proximal tumors (85.7{\%} vs. 14.1{\%}). When given, the type of neoadjuvant treatment consisted of chemoradiotherapy in all patients who suffered an injury, whereas it was only administered to 21.3{\%} of patients without an injury. There were no deaths among three patients in whom the injury was identified intraoperatively. Mortality occurred in three of four patients (75.0{\%}) with an injury detected postoperatively. Conclusions Patients with proximal tumors and radiation administration as a component of neoadjuvant treatment are more likely to suffer a tracheobronchial injury. An aggressive reoperative approach is warranted in patients with injuries that are discovered postoperatively.",
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