Trade-offs between formal home health care and informal family caregiving

Shelley White-Means, Rose M. Rubin

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Using 1994 National Long Term Care Survey data, we estimated logistic regressions of formal and informal home health care use and hours. Home health care use and intensity were differentially impacted by chronic conditions, are higher for Medicaid enrollees and rural or small town residents, but lower for HMO enrollees. Decreases in the probability of home health care use increased informal instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) support four hours and decreased informal activities of daily living (ADL) support eight hours weekly. IADL caregiving substituted for formal care, but ADL caregiving declined with reductions in formal care. Public policy reducing formal home health care access may reduce informal ADL caregiving and increase informal IADL caregiving, producing net declines in support.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)335-358
Number of pages24
JournalJournal of Family and Economic Issues
Volume25
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2004

Fingerprint

Home Care Services
Activities of Daily Living
Delivery of Health Care
Health Maintenance Organizations
Medicaid
Long-Term Care
Public Policy
Healthcare
Trade-offs
Caregiving
Activities of daily living
Logistic Models

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology
  • Economics and Econometrics

Cite this

Trade-offs between formal home health care and informal family caregiving. / White-Means, Shelley; Rubin, Rose M.

In: Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Vol. 25, No. 3, 01.09.2004, p. 335-358.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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