Trans-Antarctic expedition

the second 100 days.

R. A. Dieter, Raymond Dieter, D. L. Dieter, R. S. Dieter, B. Dieter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

On July 27, 1989, six men and 39 sled dogs embarked on the first trans-Antarctic dog, sled, and ski crossing. Data sheets were developed and a review of their day-by-day reports was carried out. The period of time covered is November 3, 1989, to February 10, 1990. Miles traveled were recorded for each day and varied from no progress to 31 miles for a single day. A running account of the total miles traveled was also maintained in relationship to the number of days traveled. Radio contact was maintained when conditions permitted. They were able to make calls home and as far away as Paris, France. The time traveled was summarized where recorded and weather conditions particularly were reviewed and maintained. Land conditions, visibility, and cloud formations were discussed. The average temperature varied from -8 degrees C to -48 degrees C (-54 degrees F). Wind conditions and land locations were recorded, as were difficulties encountered on each day. High-calorie foods were eaten. One dog ate as many as 12,000 calories per day. Following a review of appropriate topics, a summary of the conditions is given.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)746-748
Number of pages3
JournalInternational journal of circumpolar health
Volume57 Suppl 1
StatePublished - Jan 1 1998
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Expeditions
Dogs
radio
Weather
France
Paris
contact
food
Radio
Running
Food
Temperature
time

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Epidemiology
  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Dieter, R. A., Dieter, R., Dieter, D. L., Dieter, R. S., & Dieter, B. (1998). Trans-Antarctic expedition: the second 100 days. International journal of circumpolar health, 57 Suppl 1, 746-748.

Trans-Antarctic expedition : the second 100 days. / Dieter, R. A.; Dieter, Raymond; Dieter, D. L.; Dieter, R. S.; Dieter, B.

In: International journal of circumpolar health, Vol. 57 Suppl 1, 01.01.1998, p. 746-748.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dieter, RA, Dieter, R, Dieter, DL, Dieter, RS & Dieter, B 1998, 'Trans-Antarctic expedition: the second 100 days.', International journal of circumpolar health, vol. 57 Suppl 1, pp. 746-748.
Dieter RA, Dieter R, Dieter DL, Dieter RS, Dieter B. Trans-Antarctic expedition: the second 100 days. International journal of circumpolar health. 1998 Jan 1;57 Suppl 1:746-748.
Dieter, R. A. ; Dieter, Raymond ; Dieter, D. L. ; Dieter, R. S. ; Dieter, B. / Trans-Antarctic expedition : the second 100 days. In: International journal of circumpolar health. 1998 ; Vol. 57 Suppl 1. pp. 746-748.
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