Transplantation of dental pulp stem cells and platelet-rich plasma for pulp regeneration

Xiaofei Zhu, Chengfei Zhang, George Huang, Gary S.P. Cheung, Waruna Lakmal Dissanayaka, Wenhao Zhu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

51 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: The loss of dental pulp may weaken teeth, rendering them susceptible to reinfection, fracture, and subsequent tooth loss. Therefore, regeneration of pulp is considered an ideal treatment to preserve teeth. The aim of this study was to explore the capacity of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) to regenerate dental pulp in canine mature permanent teeth. Methods: Pulpectomy with apical foramen enlarged to a #80 file was performed in 16 upper premolars of 4 beagle dogs. Four experimental groups were randomly established: (1) the blood clot group, (2) the autologous DPSCs group, (3) the PRP group, and (4) the DP + PRP group (a mixture of DPSCs and PRP). Four lower premolars without any further treatment after pulpectomy were used as the control group. All teeth were sealed with mineral trioxide aggregate and composite. Twelve weeks after transplantation, the teeth were subjected to radiographic and histologic examination. Results: Twenty-four of 32 experimental root canals gained newly formed tissues. All canals with an introduction of a blood clot showed histologic evidence of vital tissue formation. Cementum-like and periodontal ligament-like tissues along the internal root canal walls were typical structures in most cases. There is no significant difference between groups with or without autologous DPSC transplantation (exact chi-square test, P <.05). Conclusions: New vital tissues can be regenerated in permanent canine teeth after pulpectomy and enlargement of the apical foramen. Histologically, transplantation of DPSCs and/or PRP into root canals showed no enhancement in new tissue formation compared with inducement of a blood clot into the root canals alone.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1604-1609
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of endodontics
Volume38
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2012

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Dental Pulp
Platelet-Rich Plasma
Regeneration
Stem Cells
Transplantation
Pulpectomy
Dental Pulp Cavity
Tooth
Tooth Apex
Thrombosis
Bicuspid
Cuspid
Dental Cementum
Tooth Loss
Periodontal Ligament
Stem Cell Transplantation
Chi-Square Distribution
Blood Group Antigens
Canidae
Dogs

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

Transplantation of dental pulp stem cells and platelet-rich plasma for pulp regeneration. / Zhu, Xiaofei; Zhang, Chengfei; Huang, George; Cheung, Gary S.P.; Dissanayaka, Waruna Lakmal; Zhu, Wenhao.

In: Journal of endodontics, Vol. 38, No. 12, 01.12.2012, p. 1604-1609.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zhu, Xiaofei ; Zhang, Chengfei ; Huang, George ; Cheung, Gary S.P. ; Dissanayaka, Waruna Lakmal ; Zhu, Wenhao. / Transplantation of dental pulp stem cells and platelet-rich plasma for pulp regeneration. In: Journal of endodontics. 2012 ; Vol. 38, No. 12. pp. 1604-1609.
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N2 - Introduction: The loss of dental pulp may weaken teeth, rendering them susceptible to reinfection, fracture, and subsequent tooth loss. Therefore, regeneration of pulp is considered an ideal treatment to preserve teeth. The aim of this study was to explore the capacity of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) to regenerate dental pulp in canine mature permanent teeth. Methods: Pulpectomy with apical foramen enlarged to a #80 file was performed in 16 upper premolars of 4 beagle dogs. Four experimental groups were randomly established: (1) the blood clot group, (2) the autologous DPSCs group, (3) the PRP group, and (4) the DP + PRP group (a mixture of DPSCs and PRP). Four lower premolars without any further treatment after pulpectomy were used as the control group. All teeth were sealed with mineral trioxide aggregate and composite. Twelve weeks after transplantation, the teeth were subjected to radiographic and histologic examination. Results: Twenty-four of 32 experimental root canals gained newly formed tissues. All canals with an introduction of a blood clot showed histologic evidence of vital tissue formation. Cementum-like and periodontal ligament-like tissues along the internal root canal walls were typical structures in most cases. There is no significant difference between groups with or without autologous DPSC transplantation (exact chi-square test, P <.05). Conclusions: New vital tissues can be regenerated in permanent canine teeth after pulpectomy and enlargement of the apical foramen. Histologically, transplantation of DPSCs and/or PRP into root canals showed no enhancement in new tissue formation compared with inducement of a blood clot into the root canals alone.

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