Transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells

intra-arterial versus intravenous administration impacts stroke outcomes in a murine model

Yukiko Kasahara, Kenichi Yamahara, Toshihiro Soma, David Stern, Takayuki Nakagomi, Tomohiro Matsuyama, Akihiko Taguchi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Based on results of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in animal models of stroke, clinical trials with hematopoietic stem cells administered intra-arterially or intravenously have been initiated in patients. Although intra-arterial injection is expected to deliver transplanted cells more directly to the ischemic tissue, the optimal route for enhancing clinical outcomes has not been identified in the setting of stroke. In this study, we compared the therapeutic potential of intra-arterial versus intravenous injection of bone marrow derived–mononuclear cells (BM-MNCs) and CD133-positive (CD133+) cells in a murine stroke model. We have found that intra-arterial injection of BM-MNCs exaggerates inflammation with accompanying loss of microvascular structures in poststroke brain and no improvement in cortical function. In contrast, intravenous injection of BM-MNCs did not similarly enhance inflammation and improved cortical function. Our results indicate that the optimal route of cell transplantation can vary with different cell populations and highlight possible issues that might arise with intra-arterial cell administration for acute ischemic cerebrovascular disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)69-80
Number of pages12
JournalTranslational Research
Volume176
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2016

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Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation
Stem cells
Intravenous Administration
Bone
Stroke
Bone Marrow Cells
Intra-Arterial Injections
Intravenous Injections
Inflammation
Cerebrovascular Disorders
Brain
Cell Transplantation
Animals
Hematopoietic Stem Cells
Cells
Tissue
Animal Models
Clinical Trials
Population
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Biochemistry, medical

Cite this

Transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells : intra-arterial versus intravenous administration impacts stroke outcomes in a murine model. / Kasahara, Yukiko; Yamahara, Kenichi; Soma, Toshihiro; Stern, David; Nakagomi, Takayuki; Matsuyama, Tomohiro; Taguchi, Akihiko.

In: Translational Research, Vol. 176, 01.10.2016, p. 69-80.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kasahara, Yukiko ; Yamahara, Kenichi ; Soma, Toshihiro ; Stern, David ; Nakagomi, Takayuki ; Matsuyama, Tomohiro ; Taguchi, Akihiko. / Transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells : intra-arterial versus intravenous administration impacts stroke outcomes in a murine model. In: Translational Research. 2016 ; Vol. 176. pp. 69-80.
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