Traumatic central cord syndrome

Etiology, management, and outcomes

Sanjay Yadla, Paul Klimo, James Harrop

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Traumatic central cord syndrome, the most common spinal cord injury syndrome, typically presents in elderly patients after a hyperextension injury. It is a clinical diagnosis, defined by weakness involving the upper more than lower extremities following a hyperextension cervical injury. Its etiology has been the subject of various pathophysiological hypotheses. The neurologic outcome for this disease is generally favorable, with the majority of patients showing significant neurological improvement over time. There is, however, continued debate over the optimal timing of surgical intervention. This review focuses on the pathophysiology, surgical and medical management, and outcomes of traumatic central cord syndrome.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)73-84
Number of pages12
JournalTopics in Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation
Volume15
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010

Fingerprint

Central Cord Syndrome
Wounds and Injuries
Nervous System Diseases
Spinal Cord Injuries
Lower Extremity

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Rehabilitation
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Traumatic central cord syndrome : Etiology, management, and outcomes. / Yadla, Sanjay; Klimo, Paul; Harrop, James.

In: Topics in Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation, Vol. 15, No. 3, 01.01.2010, p. 73-84.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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