Treadmill workstations

A worksite physical activity intervention in overweight and obese office workers

Dinesh John, Dixie L. Thompson, Hollie Raynor, Kenneth Bielak, Bob Rider, David R. Bassett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

61 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To determine if a treadmill-workstation (TMWS) increases physical activity (PA) and influences anthropometric, body composition, cardiovascular, and metabolic variables in overweight and obese officeworkers. Methods: Twelve (mean age= 46.2 ± 9.2 years) overweight/obese sedentary office-workers (mean BMI= 33.9 ± 5.0 kg·m-2) volunteered to participate in this 9-month study. After baseline measurements of postural allocation, steps per day, anthropometric variables, body composition, cardiovascular, and metabolic variables, TMWS were installed in the participants' offices for their use. Baseline measurements were repeated after 3 and 9 months. Comparisons of the outcome variables were made using repeated-measures ANOVAs or nonparametric Friedman's Rank Tests. Results: Between baseline and 9 months, significant increases were seen in the median standing (146-203 min·day-1) and stepping time (52-90 min·day-1) and total steps/day (4351-7080 steps/day; P < .05). Correspondingly, the median time spent sitting/lying decreased (1238-1150 min·day-1; P < .05). Using the TMWS significantly reduced waist (by 5.5 cm) and hip circumference (by 4.8 cm), low-density lipoproteins (LDL) (by 16 mg·dL-1), and total cholesterol (by 15 mg·dL-1) during the study (P < .05). Conclusion: The additional PA energy expenditure from using the TMWS favorably influenced waist and hip circumferences and lipid and metabolic profiles in overweight and obese office-workers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1034-1043
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Physical Activity and Health
Volume8
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2011

Fingerprint

Workplace
Body Composition
Hip
Metabolome
Waist Circumference
LDL Lipoproteins
Energy Metabolism
Analysis of Variance
Cholesterol
Lipids

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Treadmill workstations : A worksite physical activity intervention in overweight and obese office workers. / John, Dinesh; Thompson, Dixie L.; Raynor, Hollie; Bielak, Kenneth; Rider, Bob; Bassett, David R.

In: Journal of Physical Activity and Health, Vol. 8, No. 8, 01.01.2011, p. 1034-1043.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

John, Dinesh ; Thompson, Dixie L. ; Raynor, Hollie ; Bielak, Kenneth ; Rider, Bob ; Bassett, David R. / Treadmill workstations : A worksite physical activity intervention in overweight and obese office workers. In: Journal of Physical Activity and Health. 2011 ; Vol. 8, No. 8. pp. 1034-1043.
@article{8e75cd6a298e4b85bcbde76727147e01,
title = "Treadmill workstations: A worksite physical activity intervention in overweight and obese office workers",
abstract = "Purpose: To determine if a treadmill-workstation (TMWS) increases physical activity (PA) and influences anthropometric, body composition, cardiovascular, and metabolic variables in overweight and obese officeworkers. Methods: Twelve (mean age= 46.2 ± 9.2 years) overweight/obese sedentary office-workers (mean BMI= 33.9 ± 5.0 kg·m-2) volunteered to participate in this 9-month study. After baseline measurements of postural allocation, steps per day, anthropometric variables, body composition, cardiovascular, and metabolic variables, TMWS were installed in the participants' offices for their use. Baseline measurements were repeated after 3 and 9 months. Comparisons of the outcome variables were made using repeated-measures ANOVAs or nonparametric Friedman's Rank Tests. Results: Between baseline and 9 months, significant increases were seen in the median standing (146-203 min·day-1) and stepping time (52-90 min·day-1) and total steps/day (4351-7080 steps/day; P < .05). Correspondingly, the median time spent sitting/lying decreased (1238-1150 min·day-1; P < .05). Using the TMWS significantly reduced waist (by 5.5 cm) and hip circumference (by 4.8 cm), low-density lipoproteins (LDL) (by 16 mg·dL-1), and total cholesterol (by 15 mg·dL-1) during the study (P < .05). Conclusion: The additional PA energy expenditure from using the TMWS favorably influenced waist and hip circumferences and lipid and metabolic profiles in overweight and obese office-workers.",
author = "Dinesh John and Thompson, {Dixie L.} and Hollie Raynor and Kenneth Bielak and Bob Rider and Bassett, {David R.}",
year = "2011",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1123/jpah.8.8.1034",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "8",
pages = "1034--1043",
journal = "Journal of Physical Activity and Health",
issn = "1543-3080",
publisher = "Human Kinetics Publishers Inc.",
number = "8",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Treadmill workstations

T2 - A worksite physical activity intervention in overweight and obese office workers

AU - John, Dinesh

AU - Thompson, Dixie L.

AU - Raynor, Hollie

AU - Bielak, Kenneth

AU - Rider, Bob

AU - Bassett, David R.

PY - 2011/1/1

Y1 - 2011/1/1

N2 - Purpose: To determine if a treadmill-workstation (TMWS) increases physical activity (PA) and influences anthropometric, body composition, cardiovascular, and metabolic variables in overweight and obese officeworkers. Methods: Twelve (mean age= 46.2 ± 9.2 years) overweight/obese sedentary office-workers (mean BMI= 33.9 ± 5.0 kg·m-2) volunteered to participate in this 9-month study. After baseline measurements of postural allocation, steps per day, anthropometric variables, body composition, cardiovascular, and metabolic variables, TMWS were installed in the participants' offices for their use. Baseline measurements were repeated after 3 and 9 months. Comparisons of the outcome variables were made using repeated-measures ANOVAs or nonparametric Friedman's Rank Tests. Results: Between baseline and 9 months, significant increases were seen in the median standing (146-203 min·day-1) and stepping time (52-90 min·day-1) and total steps/day (4351-7080 steps/day; P < .05). Correspondingly, the median time spent sitting/lying decreased (1238-1150 min·day-1; P < .05). Using the TMWS significantly reduced waist (by 5.5 cm) and hip circumference (by 4.8 cm), low-density lipoproteins (LDL) (by 16 mg·dL-1), and total cholesterol (by 15 mg·dL-1) during the study (P < .05). Conclusion: The additional PA energy expenditure from using the TMWS favorably influenced waist and hip circumferences and lipid and metabolic profiles in overweight and obese office-workers.

AB - Purpose: To determine if a treadmill-workstation (TMWS) increases physical activity (PA) and influences anthropometric, body composition, cardiovascular, and metabolic variables in overweight and obese officeworkers. Methods: Twelve (mean age= 46.2 ± 9.2 years) overweight/obese sedentary office-workers (mean BMI= 33.9 ± 5.0 kg·m-2) volunteered to participate in this 9-month study. After baseline measurements of postural allocation, steps per day, anthropometric variables, body composition, cardiovascular, and metabolic variables, TMWS were installed in the participants' offices for their use. Baseline measurements were repeated after 3 and 9 months. Comparisons of the outcome variables were made using repeated-measures ANOVAs or nonparametric Friedman's Rank Tests. Results: Between baseline and 9 months, significant increases were seen in the median standing (146-203 min·day-1) and stepping time (52-90 min·day-1) and total steps/day (4351-7080 steps/day; P < .05). Correspondingly, the median time spent sitting/lying decreased (1238-1150 min·day-1; P < .05). Using the TMWS significantly reduced waist (by 5.5 cm) and hip circumference (by 4.8 cm), low-density lipoproteins (LDL) (by 16 mg·dL-1), and total cholesterol (by 15 mg·dL-1) during the study (P < .05). Conclusion: The additional PA energy expenditure from using the TMWS favorably influenced waist and hip circumferences and lipid and metabolic profiles in overweight and obese office-workers.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=80155194070&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=80155194070&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1123/jpah.8.8.1034

DO - 10.1123/jpah.8.8.1034

M3 - Article

VL - 8

SP - 1034

EP - 1043

JO - Journal of Physical Activity and Health

JF - Journal of Physical Activity and Health

SN - 1543-3080

IS - 8

ER -