Treating children with cancer worldwide-challenges and interventions

Trijn Israels, Julia Challinor, Scott Howard, Ramandeep Harman Arora

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although morbidity from childhood cancer is second only to unintentional injuries in highincome countries, in low-income countries, it hardly hits the radar screen compared with death from pneumonia, diarrhea, malaria, neonatal sepsis, preterm birth, and neonatal asphyxia. Nevertheless, the extraordinary progress made in treating childhood cancer in high-income countries brings into harsh focus the mammoth disparities that exist in impoverished areas of the world. As the capacity to diagnose and treat childhood cancer improves in low- and middle-income countries, the ability to improve outcomes for the more common diseases benefits as well. The authors have summarized the issues related to childhood cancer care with thoughtful attention to how children everywhere can gain from the advances in medical science in high-income nations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)607-610
Number of pages4
JournalPediatrics
Volume136
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2015

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Neoplasms
Radar
Second Primary Neoplasms
Asphyxia
Premature Birth
Malaria
Diarrhea
Pneumonia
Morbidity
Wounds and Injuries
Neonatal Sepsis

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Treating children with cancer worldwide-challenges and interventions. / Israels, Trijn; Challinor, Julia; Howard, Scott; Arora, Ramandeep Harman.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 136, No. 4, 01.10.2015, p. 607-610.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Israels, Trijn ; Challinor, Julia ; Howard, Scott ; Arora, Ramandeep Harman. / Treating children with cancer worldwide-challenges and interventions. In: Pediatrics. 2015 ; Vol. 136, No. 4. pp. 607-610.
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