Treatment of advanced gastrointestinal cancer with 5‐fluorouracil and mitomycin C

Stephen Krauss, Takuo Sonoda, Alan Solomon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

65 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Fifty‐one patients with metastatic and/or recurrent gastrointestinal cancer received a regimen of continuous 5‐fluorouracil infusion and mitomycin C. Among patients with colorectal cancer, 9 (33%) showed tumor regression, 10 showed objective tumor response <50%, and 3 were evaluated as stable. While the median response duration of 5 months was relatively brief, 7 patients survived for 1 year or more and one is still alive >22 months after the onset of treatment. Three of 9 patients with gastric cancer were responders, one complete. The median survival was 11 months; 3 patients survived for 1 year or more, one for 21 months from the initiation of therapy. Half of 8 patients with pancreatic cancer showed some objective response, 3 with >50% tumor regression. Duration of response in these 3 cases is 5+, 10, and 10+ months. In our series, mild to moderate hematologic toxicity was encountered in 63% and tended to be cumulative. There were no serious infections, and 2 instances of prolonged thrombocytopenia. Partial alopecia developed in most patients; gastrointestinal toxicity was minimal. That this combination may cause pulmonary toxicity was suggested by the development of severe respiratory insufficiency without apparent cause in 3 patients, all of which had at least 2 cycles of treatment. A transient response to corticosteroids was obtained. One patient, free of tumor at autopsy, demonstrated a glomerular lesion previously described with mitomycin C toxicity, while 2 others developed a micro‐angiopathic hemolytic anemia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1598-1603
Number of pages6
JournalCancer
Volume43
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1979

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Gastrointestinal Neoplasms
Mitomycin
Therapeutics
Neoplasms
Hemolytic Anemia
Alopecia
Pancreatic Neoplasms
Respiratory Insufficiency
Thrombocytopenia
Stomach Neoplasms
Colorectal Neoplasms
Autopsy
Adrenal Cortex Hormones
Lung
Survival
Infection

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Treatment of advanced gastrointestinal cancer with 5‐fluorouracil and mitomycin C. / Krauss, Stephen; Sonoda, Takuo; Solomon, Alan.

In: Cancer, Vol. 43, No. 5, 01.01.1979, p. 1598-1603.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Krauss, Stephen ; Sonoda, Takuo ; Solomon, Alan. / Treatment of advanced gastrointestinal cancer with 5‐fluorouracil and mitomycin C. In: Cancer. 1979 ; Vol. 43, No. 5. pp. 1598-1603.
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