Treatment of moderate to severe acute hypocalcemia in critically ill trauma patients

Roland Dickerson, Laurie M. Morgan, Martin Croce, Gayle Minard, Rex Brown

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Our recent data indicate that 21% of critically ill, adult, multiple-trauma patients receiving specialized nutrition support experience hypocalcemia. However, evidence-based methods for the treatment of moderate to severe acute hypocalcemia (ionized calcium concentration [iCa] <1 mmol/L) are lacking. Methods: The efficacy of an infusion of 4 g of calcium gluconate was evaluated in 20 critically ill, adult, multiple-trauma patients with moderate to severe hypocalcemia (iCa <1 mmol/L). The calcium gluconate was infused at a rate of 1 g/h in a small volume admixture. A serum iCa determination was obtained on the following day. Results: Calcium gluconate infusion significantly increased serum iCa from 0.90 ± 0.08 mmol/L to 1.16 ± 0.11 mmol/L (p < .001) on the following day. This dosage regimen was successful for achieving a serum iCa >1 mmol/L for 19 of 20 (95%) hypocalcemic patients and achieved a concentration >1.12 mmol/L in 14 (70%) of the patients. Two patients developed mild hypercalcemia (iCa of 1.34 mmol/L and 1.38 mmol/L) postinfusion. Conclusions: A short-term infusion of 4 g of intravenous (IV) calcium gluconate for the treatment of moderate to severe hypocalcemia appears to be a promising regimen for critically ill, adult, multiple-trauma patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)228-233
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition
Volume31
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2007

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hypocalcemia
Hypocalcemia
Critical Illness
Wounds and Injuries
Multiple Trauma
Calcium Gluconate
Calcium
Therapeutics
calcium
hypercalcemia
Hypercalcemia
nutrition

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Food Science
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Treatment of moderate to severe acute hypocalcemia in critically ill trauma patients. / Dickerson, Roland; Morgan, Laurie M.; Croce, Martin; Minard, Gayle; Brown, Rex.

In: Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, Vol. 31, No. 3, 01.05.2007, p. 228-233.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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