Treatment of Refractory Convulsive Status Epilepticus in Children

Other Therapies

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Refractory convulsive status epilepticus occurs when seizures are not controlled with initial benzodiazepine therapy or a subsequent anticonvulsant drug. Typically drug-induced anesthesia is then pursued with midazolam or a barbiturate. This results in prolonged, intensive care, which requires meticulous attention to medical management to minimize complications. When seizures persist other options must be considered. These include (1) other medications, (2) surgery, (3) the ketogenic diet, (4) hypothermia, (5) inhalational anesthetic agents, and (6) immune modulating therapy. This review addresses the literature related to the use of the latter (4) treatment options. I will discuss the role of each treatment and review the evidence for it's use, along with possible side-effects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)190-194
Number of pages5
JournalSeminars in Pediatric Neurology
Volume17
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2010

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Status Epilepticus
Seizures
Ketogenic Diet
Midazolam
Therapeutics
Critical Care
Hypothermia
Benzodiazepines
Anticonvulsants
Anesthetics
Anesthesia
Pharmaceutical Preparations

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Treatment of Refractory Convulsive Status Epilepticus in Children : Other Therapies. / Wheless, James.

In: Seminars in Pediatric Neurology, Vol. 17, No. 3, 01.09.2010, p. 190-194.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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