Treatment of Rigid Hammer-Toe Deformity

Permanent Versus Removable Implant Selection

Jesse Doty, Jason A. Fogleman

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Hammer-toe deformities that fail nonoperative treatment can be successfully addressed with proximal interphalangeal joint resection arthroplasty or fusion. The goal of surgery is to eliminate the deformity and rigidly fix the toe in a well-aligned position. Hammer-toe correction procedures can be performed with temporary Kirschner wire (K-wire) fixation for 3 to 6 weeks with high success rates. Pain relief with successful hammer-toe correction approaches 90%; patient satisfaction rates approximate 84%. Although complication rates are rare in most series, there remains a concern regarding exposed temporary K-wire fixation, which has led to the development of multiple permanent internal fixation options.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)91-101
Number of pages11
JournalFoot and Ankle Clinics
Volume23
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2018

Fingerprint

Hammer Toe Syndrome
Bone Wires
Toes
Patient Satisfaction
Arthroplasty
Therapeutics
Joints
Pain

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Treatment of Rigid Hammer-Toe Deformity : Permanent Versus Removable Implant Selection. / Doty, Jesse; Fogleman, Jason A.

In: Foot and Ankle Clinics, Vol. 23, No. 1, 01.03.2018, p. 91-101.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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