Treatment Outcomes in Patients with Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

a Retrospective Analysis of a Community Oncology Database

Maxine D. Fisher, Sonia Pulgar, Matthew H. Kulke, Beloo Mirakhur, Paul J. Miller, Mark S. Walker, Lee Schwartzberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: Metastatic neuroendocrine tumors (mNETs) are rare, heterogeneous tumors that present diagnostic and treatment challenges, with limited data on the management of mNETs in clinical practice. The present study was designed to identify current diagnostic and treatment patterns in mNET patients treated in the US community oncology setting. Methods: Patient-level data was collected from medical records of adults with mNETs from the Vector Oncology Data Warehouse, a comprehensive US community oncology network database. Results: Of the 263 patients included (median follow-up, 22 months; range, 0.1–193.9), 30.4% (80/263) had intestinal tumors, 11.0% (29/263) had pancreatic, and 58.6% (154/263) had tumors of other or unknown location. Progression-free survival (PFS) from the start of first-line therapy differed significantly by tumor grade (log rank P = 0.0016) and location (P = 0.0044), as did overall survival (OS) (grade, P < 0.0001; location, P = 0.0068). Median PFS and OS for patients with undocumented tumor grade were shorter than for patients with G1/G2 tumors and longer than patients with G3 tumors. Median PFS and OS for patients with other or unknown tumors were shorter than for patients with intestinal tumors. Conclusions: While potentially confounded by the high number of patients with other or unknown tumor locations, this retrospective study of patients in a US community oncology setting identified the importance of awareness of tumor grade and tumor location at diagnosis, as these were direct correlates of PFS and OS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Gastrointestinal Cancer
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

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Neuroendocrine Tumors
Databases
Neoplasms
Disease-Free Survival
Survival
Community Networks
Medical Records
Therapeutics
Retrospective Studies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology
  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Treatment Outcomes in Patients with Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumors : a Retrospective Analysis of a Community Oncology Database. / Fisher, Maxine D.; Pulgar, Sonia; Kulke, Matthew H.; Mirakhur, Beloo; Miller, Paul J.; Walker, Mark S.; Schwartzberg, Lee.

In: Journal of Gastrointestinal Cancer, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fisher, Maxine D. ; Pulgar, Sonia ; Kulke, Matthew H. ; Mirakhur, Beloo ; Miller, Paul J. ; Walker, Mark S. ; Schwartzberg, Lee. / Treatment Outcomes in Patients with Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumors : a Retrospective Analysis of a Community Oncology Database. In: Journal of Gastrointestinal Cancer. 2018.
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abstract = "Purpose: Metastatic neuroendocrine tumors (mNETs) are rare, heterogeneous tumors that present diagnostic and treatment challenges, with limited data on the management of mNETs in clinical practice. The present study was designed to identify current diagnostic and treatment patterns in mNET patients treated in the US community oncology setting. Methods: Patient-level data was collected from medical records of adults with mNETs from the Vector Oncology Data Warehouse, a comprehensive US community oncology network database. Results: Of the 263 patients included (median follow-up, 22 months; range, 0.1–193.9), 30.4{\%} (80/263) had intestinal tumors, 11.0{\%} (29/263) had pancreatic, and 58.6{\%} (154/263) had tumors of other or unknown location. Progression-free survival (PFS) from the start of first-line therapy differed significantly by tumor grade (log rank P = 0.0016) and location (P = 0.0044), as did overall survival (OS) (grade, P < 0.0001; location, P = 0.0068). Median PFS and OS for patients with undocumented tumor grade were shorter than for patients with G1/G2 tumors and longer than patients with G3 tumors. Median PFS and OS for patients with other or unknown tumors were shorter than for patients with intestinal tumors. Conclusions: While potentially confounded by the high number of patients with other or unknown tumor locations, this retrospective study of patients in a US community oncology setting identified the importance of awareness of tumor grade and tumor location at diagnosis, as these were direct correlates of PFS and OS.",
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