Treatment summaries and follow-up care instructions for cancer survivors

Improving survivor self-efficacy and health care utilization

Kelly M. Kenzik, Elizabeth A. Kvale, Gabrielle B. Rocque, Wendy Demark-Wahnefried, Michelle Martin, Bradford E. Jackson, Karen Meneses, Edward E. Partridge, Maria Pisu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Treatment summaries and follow-up care plan information should be provided to cancer survivors. This study examines the association of receiving summaries and care planswith cancer survivor self-efficacy for chronic illness management, and whether self-efficacy was associated with health care utilization. Methods. Four hundred forty-one cancer survivors (≥2 years from diagnosis and had completed treatment)≥65 years old from 12 cancer centers across 5 states completed telephone surveys. Survivors responded to three questions about receiving a written treatment summary, written follow-up plan, and an explanation of follow-up care plans. Respondents completed the Stanford Chronic Illness Management Self-Efficacy Scale and reported emergency roomvisits and hospitalizations in the past year. Three multiple linear regression models estimated the association of written treatment summary, written follow-up care plan, and verbal explanation of follow-up plan with total self-efficacy score. Log-binomial models estimated the association of self-efficacy scores with emergency room visits and hospitalizations (yes/no). Results. Among survivors, 40% and 35% received a written treatment summary and follow-up care plan, respectively. Seventy-nine percent received an explanation of follow-up care plans. Receiving a verbal explanation of follow-up care instructions was significantly associated with higher self-efficacy scores (β=0.72,p=.009).Higher self-efficacy scores were significantly associated with lower prevalence ratios ofemergency roomvisits (prevalence ratio, 0.92; 95% confidence interval, 0.88-0.97) and hospitalizations (prevalence ratio, 0.94; 95% confidence interval, 0.89-0.99). Conclusion. Explanation of the follow-up care plan, beyond the written component, enhances survivor self-efficacy for managing cancerasachroniccondition-an importantmediator for improving health care utilization outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)817-824
Number of pages8
JournalOncologist
Volume21
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2016

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Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Aftercare
Self Efficacy
Self Care
Survivors
Neoplasms
Hospitalization
Therapeutics
Linear Models
Chronic Disease
Confidence Intervals
Statistical Models
Telephone
Hospital Emergency Service
Emergencies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Treatment summaries and follow-up care instructions for cancer survivors : Improving survivor self-efficacy and health care utilization. / Kenzik, Kelly M.; Kvale, Elizabeth A.; Rocque, Gabrielle B.; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Martin, Michelle; Jackson, Bradford E.; Meneses, Karen; Partridge, Edward E.; Pisu, Maria.

In: Oncologist, Vol. 21, No. 7, 01.07.2016, p. 817-824.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kenzik, KM, Kvale, EA, Rocque, GB, Demark-Wahnefried, W, Martin, M, Jackson, BE, Meneses, K, Partridge, EE & Pisu, M 2016, 'Treatment summaries and follow-up care instructions for cancer survivors: Improving survivor self-efficacy and health care utilization', Oncologist, vol. 21, no. 7, pp. 817-824. https://doi.org/10.1634/theoncologist.2015-0517
Kenzik, Kelly M. ; Kvale, Elizabeth A. ; Rocque, Gabrielle B. ; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy ; Martin, Michelle ; Jackson, Bradford E. ; Meneses, Karen ; Partridge, Edward E. ; Pisu, Maria. / Treatment summaries and follow-up care instructions for cancer survivors : Improving survivor self-efficacy and health care utilization. In: Oncologist. 2016 ; Vol. 21, No. 7. pp. 817-824.
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abstract = "Background. Treatment summaries and follow-up care plan information should be provided to cancer survivors. This study examines the association of receiving summaries and care planswith cancer survivor self-efficacy for chronic illness management, and whether self-efficacy was associated with health care utilization. Methods. Four hundred forty-one cancer survivors (≥2 years from diagnosis and had completed treatment)≥65 years old from 12 cancer centers across 5 states completed telephone surveys. Survivors responded to three questions about receiving a written treatment summary, written follow-up plan, and an explanation of follow-up care plans. Respondents completed the Stanford Chronic Illness Management Self-Efficacy Scale and reported emergency roomvisits and hospitalizations in the past year. Three multiple linear regression models estimated the association of written treatment summary, written follow-up care plan, and verbal explanation of follow-up plan with total self-efficacy score. Log-binomial models estimated the association of self-efficacy scores with emergency room visits and hospitalizations (yes/no). Results. Among survivors, 40{\%} and 35{\%} received a written treatment summary and follow-up care plan, respectively. Seventy-nine percent received an explanation of follow-up care plans. Receiving a verbal explanation of follow-up care instructions was significantly associated with higher self-efficacy scores (β=0.72,p=.009).Higher self-efficacy scores were significantly associated with lower prevalence ratios ofemergency roomvisits (prevalence ratio, 0.92; 95{\%} confidence interval, 0.88-0.97) and hospitalizations (prevalence ratio, 0.94; 95{\%} confidence interval, 0.89-0.99). Conclusion. Explanation of the follow-up care plan, beyond the written component, enhances survivor self-efficacy for managing cancerasachroniccondition-an importantmediator for improving health care utilization outcomes.",
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T1 - Treatment summaries and follow-up care instructions for cancer survivors

T2 - Improving survivor self-efficacy and health care utilization

AU - Kenzik, Kelly M.

AU - Kvale, Elizabeth A.

AU - Rocque, Gabrielle B.

AU - Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy

AU - Martin, Michelle

AU - Jackson, Bradford E.

AU - Meneses, Karen

AU - Partridge, Edward E.

AU - Pisu, Maria

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N2 - Background. Treatment summaries and follow-up care plan information should be provided to cancer survivors. This study examines the association of receiving summaries and care planswith cancer survivor self-efficacy for chronic illness management, and whether self-efficacy was associated with health care utilization. Methods. Four hundred forty-one cancer survivors (≥2 years from diagnosis and had completed treatment)≥65 years old from 12 cancer centers across 5 states completed telephone surveys. Survivors responded to three questions about receiving a written treatment summary, written follow-up plan, and an explanation of follow-up care plans. Respondents completed the Stanford Chronic Illness Management Self-Efficacy Scale and reported emergency roomvisits and hospitalizations in the past year. Three multiple linear regression models estimated the association of written treatment summary, written follow-up care plan, and verbal explanation of follow-up plan with total self-efficacy score. Log-binomial models estimated the association of self-efficacy scores with emergency room visits and hospitalizations (yes/no). Results. Among survivors, 40% and 35% received a written treatment summary and follow-up care plan, respectively. Seventy-nine percent received an explanation of follow-up care plans. Receiving a verbal explanation of follow-up care instructions was significantly associated with higher self-efficacy scores (β=0.72,p=.009).Higher self-efficacy scores were significantly associated with lower prevalence ratios ofemergency roomvisits (prevalence ratio, 0.92; 95% confidence interval, 0.88-0.97) and hospitalizations (prevalence ratio, 0.94; 95% confidence interval, 0.89-0.99). Conclusion. Explanation of the follow-up care plan, beyond the written component, enhances survivor self-efficacy for managing cancerasachroniccondition-an importantmediator for improving health care utilization outcomes.

AB - Background. Treatment summaries and follow-up care plan information should be provided to cancer survivors. This study examines the association of receiving summaries and care planswith cancer survivor self-efficacy for chronic illness management, and whether self-efficacy was associated with health care utilization. Methods. Four hundred forty-one cancer survivors (≥2 years from diagnosis and had completed treatment)≥65 years old from 12 cancer centers across 5 states completed telephone surveys. Survivors responded to three questions about receiving a written treatment summary, written follow-up plan, and an explanation of follow-up care plans. Respondents completed the Stanford Chronic Illness Management Self-Efficacy Scale and reported emergency roomvisits and hospitalizations in the past year. Three multiple linear regression models estimated the association of written treatment summary, written follow-up care plan, and verbal explanation of follow-up plan with total self-efficacy score. Log-binomial models estimated the association of self-efficacy scores with emergency room visits and hospitalizations (yes/no). Results. Among survivors, 40% and 35% received a written treatment summary and follow-up care plan, respectively. Seventy-nine percent received an explanation of follow-up care plans. Receiving a verbal explanation of follow-up care instructions was significantly associated with higher self-efficacy scores (β=0.72,p=.009).Higher self-efficacy scores were significantly associated with lower prevalence ratios ofemergency roomvisits (prevalence ratio, 0.92; 95% confidence interval, 0.88-0.97) and hospitalizations (prevalence ratio, 0.94; 95% confidence interval, 0.89-0.99). Conclusion. Explanation of the follow-up care plan, beyond the written component, enhances survivor self-efficacy for managing cancerasachroniccondition-an importantmediator for improving health care utilization outcomes.

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