Trends in hospitalization characteristics for pediatric nephrotic syndrome in the USA

Rose M. Ayoob, David Hains, William E. Smoyer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim: The overall aim of the current study was to analyze trends in hospital charges, length of stay (LOS), and mortality for children hospitalized with nephrotic syndrome (NS) in the US. Methods: Hospitalization characteristics for children ages 0 - 17 years discharged with the principal diagnosis of NS (ICD-9-CM 581.9) in 2000, 2003, and 2006 were evaluated using the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) Kids' Inpatient Database (KID). Results: The mean number of children hospitalized with a principal diagnosis of NS was 1,869 per year. These discharges accounted for mean total hospital charges that increased from $11,338 to $16,760 and aggregate hospital charges that increased from $21 to $31 million dollars from 2000 to 2006. Compared to non-children's hospitals, children's hospitals had significantly higher mean hospital charges and longer lengths of stay. Importantly, the estimated mortality rate for NS (< 0.5%) was notably lower than prior reports and remained stable throughout the study period. Conclusions: The national health care expenditures for pediatric NSrelated hospitalizations are both significant and growing, although mortality is now far lower than previously reported.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)106-111
Number of pages6
JournalClinical Nephrology
Volume78
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2012

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Hospital Charges
Nephrotic Syndrome
Hospitalization
Pediatrics
Hospitalized Child
Length of Stay
Child Mortality
Mortality
International Classification of Diseases
Health Expenditures
Health Care Costs
Inpatients
Databases
Delivery of Health Care

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Nephrology

Cite this

Trends in hospitalization characteristics for pediatric nephrotic syndrome in the USA. / Ayoob, Rose M.; Hains, David; Smoyer, William E.

In: Clinical Nephrology, Vol. 78, No. 2, 01.08.2012, p. 106-111.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ayoob, Rose M. ; Hains, David ; Smoyer, William E. / Trends in hospitalization characteristics for pediatric nephrotic syndrome in the USA. In: Clinical Nephrology. 2012 ; Vol. 78, No. 2. pp. 106-111.
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