Trends of Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections in a neonatal intensive care unit from 2000-2009

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Abstract

Background: Invasive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) infections are major causes of numerous neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) outbreaks. There have been increasing reports of MRSA outbreaks in various neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) over the last decade. Our objective was to review the experience of Staphylococcus aureus sepsis in our NICU in the last decade and describe the trends in the incidence of Staphylococcus aureus blood stream infections from 2000 to 2009.Methods: A retrospective perinatal database review of all neonates admitted to our NICU with blood cultures positive for Staphylococcus aureus from (Jan 1st 2000 to December 31st 2009) was conducted. Infants were identified from the database and data were collected regarding their clinical characteristics and co-morbidities, including shock with sepsis and mortality. Period A represents patients admitted in 2000-2003. Period B represents patients seen in 2004-2009.Results: During the study period, 156/11111 infants were identified with Staphylococcus aureus blood stream infection: 41/4486 (0.91%) infants in Period A and 115/6625 (1.73%) in Period B (p < 0.0004). Mean gestation at birth was 26 weeks for infants in both periods. There were more MRSA infections in Period B (24% vs. 55% p < 0.05) and they were associated with more severe outcomes. In comparing the cases of MRSA infections observed in the two periods, infants in period B notably had significantly more pneumonia cases (2.4% vs. 27%, p = 0.0005) and a significantly higher mortality rate (0% vs. 15.7%, p = 0.0038). The incidences of skin and soft tissue infections and of necrotizing enterocolitis were not significantly changed in the two periods.Conclusion: There was an increase in the incidence of Staphylococcus aureus infection among neonates after 2004. Although MSSA continues to be a problem in the NICU, MRSA infections were more prevalent in the past 6 years in our NICU. Increased severity of staphylococcal infections and associated rising mortality are possibly related to the increasing MRSA infections with a more virulent community-associated strain.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number121
JournalBMC Pediatrics
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - May 9 2014

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Neonatal Intensive Care Units
Staphylococcus aureus
Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus
Infection
Methicillin
Disease Outbreaks
Mortality
Sepsis
Incidence
Newborn Infant
Databases
Staphylococcal Infections
Necrotizing Enterocolitis
Soft Tissue Infections
Shock
Pneumonia
Parturition
Morbidity
Pregnancy
Skin

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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Trends of Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections in a neonatal intensive care unit from 2000-2009. / Dolapo, Olajide; Dhanireddy, Ramasubbareddy; Talati, Ajay.

In: BMC Pediatrics, Vol. 14, No. 1, 121, 09.05.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background: Invasive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) infections are major causes of numerous neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) outbreaks. There have been increasing reports of MRSA outbreaks in various neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) over the last decade. Our objective was to review the experience of Staphylococcus aureus sepsis in our NICU in the last decade and describe the trends in the incidence of Staphylococcus aureus blood stream infections from 2000 to 2009.Methods: A retrospective perinatal database review of all neonates admitted to our NICU with blood cultures positive for Staphylococcus aureus from (Jan 1st 2000 to December 31st 2009) was conducted. Infants were identified from the database and data were collected regarding their clinical characteristics and co-morbidities, including shock with sepsis and mortality. Period A represents patients admitted in 2000-2003. Period B represents patients seen in 2004-2009.Results: During the study period, 156/11111 infants were identified with Staphylococcus aureus blood stream infection: 41/4486 (0.91{\%}) infants in Period A and 115/6625 (1.73{\%}) in Period B (p < 0.0004). Mean gestation at birth was 26 weeks for infants in both periods. There were more MRSA infections in Period B (24{\%} vs. 55{\%} p < 0.05) and they were associated with more severe outcomes. In comparing the cases of MRSA infections observed in the two periods, infants in period B notably had significantly more pneumonia cases (2.4{\%} vs. 27{\%}, p = 0.0005) and a significantly higher mortality rate (0{\%} vs. 15.7{\%}, p = 0.0038). The incidences of skin and soft tissue infections and of necrotizing enterocolitis were not significantly changed in the two periods.Conclusion: There was an increase in the incidence of Staphylococcus aureus infection among neonates after 2004. Although MSSA continues to be a problem in the NICU, MRSA infections were more prevalent in the past 6 years in our NICU. Increased severity of staphylococcal infections and associated rising mortality are possibly related to the increasing MRSA infections with a more virulent community-associated strain.",
author = "Olajide Dolapo and Ramasubbareddy Dhanireddy and Ajay Talati",
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N2 - Background: Invasive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) infections are major causes of numerous neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) outbreaks. There have been increasing reports of MRSA outbreaks in various neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) over the last decade. Our objective was to review the experience of Staphylococcus aureus sepsis in our NICU in the last decade and describe the trends in the incidence of Staphylococcus aureus blood stream infections from 2000 to 2009.Methods: A retrospective perinatal database review of all neonates admitted to our NICU with blood cultures positive for Staphylococcus aureus from (Jan 1st 2000 to December 31st 2009) was conducted. Infants were identified from the database and data were collected regarding their clinical characteristics and co-morbidities, including shock with sepsis and mortality. Period A represents patients admitted in 2000-2003. Period B represents patients seen in 2004-2009.Results: During the study period, 156/11111 infants were identified with Staphylococcus aureus blood stream infection: 41/4486 (0.91%) infants in Period A and 115/6625 (1.73%) in Period B (p < 0.0004). Mean gestation at birth was 26 weeks for infants in both periods. There were more MRSA infections in Period B (24% vs. 55% p < 0.05) and they were associated with more severe outcomes. In comparing the cases of MRSA infections observed in the two periods, infants in period B notably had significantly more pneumonia cases (2.4% vs. 27%, p = 0.0005) and a significantly higher mortality rate (0% vs. 15.7%, p = 0.0038). The incidences of skin and soft tissue infections and of necrotizing enterocolitis were not significantly changed in the two periods.Conclusion: There was an increase in the incidence of Staphylococcus aureus infection among neonates after 2004. Although MSSA continues to be a problem in the NICU, MRSA infections were more prevalent in the past 6 years in our NICU. Increased severity of staphylococcal infections and associated rising mortality are possibly related to the increasing MRSA infections with a more virulent community-associated strain.

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