Twenty-four-hour heart rate and blood pressure are additive markers of left ventricular mass in hypertensive subjects

Nikolaos A. Zakopoulos, Ignatios Ikonomidis, Konstantinos N. Vemmos, Efstathios Manios, Ioanna Spiliopoulou, Georgios Tsivgoulis, Konstantinos Spengos, Dora Psaltopoulou, Myron Mavrikakis, Spyridon D. Moulopoulos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background: We investigated whether mean heart rate (HR24) and blood pressure (BP) parameters during 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring (ABP) are independent or additive markers of left ventricular (LV) mass in subjects with newly diagnosed, untreated hypertension. Methods: A total of 250 patients (40% women, 60% men; mean age 59.6 ± 11 years) with essential hypertension who were attending the outpatient Hypertension Unit were studied. All patients underwent 24-h ABP and HR monitoring as well as echocardiography for assessment of left ventricular (LV) dimensions and function. Results: A decreasing HR 24 or increasing ABP parameters (ie, systolic, diastolic, mean BP, and pulse pressure) were associated with increasing LV mass (P < .001) and wall thickness (P < .01). In multivariate analysis, after adjusting for age, gender, body surface area, body mass index, hematocrit, glucose, cholesterol, smoking, and each of the measured ABP parameters separately, decreasing HR 24 was independently related to increasing LV mass in addition to ABP and body size parameters (P < .001). The addition of HR24 in different multivariate models for prediction of LV mass significantly increased the adjusted model r2 (range of r2 change: 0.039 to 0.064, P for change <.05). Decreasing HR24 or HR during daytime (6 am to 10 pm) was associated with a higher likelihood of LV hypertrophy in addition to ABP parameters (adjusted odds ratio 0.92 (CI 0.87 to 0.98), per 1 beat/min greater HR24 P = .002 and 0.93 (CI: 0.87 to 0.98), per 1 beat/min greater HR in the daytime P = .017). Conclusion: The 24-h HR and BP during ABP are independent and additive markers of increased LV mass in untreated hypertensive individuals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)170-177
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican journal of hypertension
Volume19
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2006

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Ambulatory Monitoring
Heart Rate
Blood Pressure
Hypertension
Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring
Body Surface Area
Body Size
Left Ventricular Hypertrophy
Hematocrit
Left Ventricular Function
Echocardiography
Body Mass Index
Outpatients
Multivariate Analysis
Smoking
Odds Ratio
Cholesterol
Glucose

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Twenty-four-hour heart rate and blood pressure are additive markers of left ventricular mass in hypertensive subjects. / Zakopoulos, Nikolaos A.; Ikonomidis, Ignatios; Vemmos, Konstantinos N.; Manios, Efstathios; Spiliopoulou, Ioanna; Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Spengos, Konstantinos; Psaltopoulou, Dora; Mavrikakis, Myron; Moulopoulos, Spyridon D.

In: American journal of hypertension, Vol. 19, No. 2, 01.02.2006, p. 170-177.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zakopoulos, NA, Ikonomidis, I, Vemmos, KN, Manios, E, Spiliopoulou, I, Tsivgoulis, G, Spengos, K, Psaltopoulou, D, Mavrikakis, M & Moulopoulos, SD 2006, 'Twenty-four-hour heart rate and blood pressure are additive markers of left ventricular mass in hypertensive subjects', American journal of hypertension, vol. 19, no. 2, pp. 170-177. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjhyper.2005.06.033
Zakopoulos, Nikolaos A. ; Ikonomidis, Ignatios ; Vemmos, Konstantinos N. ; Manios, Efstathios ; Spiliopoulou, Ioanna ; Tsivgoulis, Georgios ; Spengos, Konstantinos ; Psaltopoulou, Dora ; Mavrikakis, Myron ; Moulopoulos, Spyridon D. / Twenty-four-hour heart rate and blood pressure are additive markers of left ventricular mass in hypertensive subjects. In: American journal of hypertension. 2006 ; Vol. 19, No. 2. pp. 170-177.
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T1 - Twenty-four-hour heart rate and blood pressure are additive markers of left ventricular mass in hypertensive subjects

AU - Zakopoulos, Nikolaos A.

AU - Ikonomidis, Ignatios

AU - Vemmos, Konstantinos N.

AU - Manios, Efstathios

AU - Spiliopoulou, Ioanna

AU - Tsivgoulis, Georgios

AU - Spengos, Konstantinos

AU - Psaltopoulou, Dora

AU - Mavrikakis, Myron

AU - Moulopoulos, Spyridon D.

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Y1 - 2006/2/1

N2 - Background: We investigated whether mean heart rate (HR24) and blood pressure (BP) parameters during 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring (ABP) are independent or additive markers of left ventricular (LV) mass in subjects with newly diagnosed, untreated hypertension. Methods: A total of 250 patients (40% women, 60% men; mean age 59.6 ± 11 years) with essential hypertension who were attending the outpatient Hypertension Unit were studied. All patients underwent 24-h ABP and HR monitoring as well as echocardiography for assessment of left ventricular (LV) dimensions and function. Results: A decreasing HR 24 or increasing ABP parameters (ie, systolic, diastolic, mean BP, and pulse pressure) were associated with increasing LV mass (P < .001) and wall thickness (P < .01). In multivariate analysis, after adjusting for age, gender, body surface area, body mass index, hematocrit, glucose, cholesterol, smoking, and each of the measured ABP parameters separately, decreasing HR 24 was independently related to increasing LV mass in addition to ABP and body size parameters (P < .001). The addition of HR24 in different multivariate models for prediction of LV mass significantly increased the adjusted model r2 (range of r2 change: 0.039 to 0.064, P for change <.05). Decreasing HR24 or HR during daytime (6 am to 10 pm) was associated with a higher likelihood of LV hypertrophy in addition to ABP parameters (adjusted odds ratio 0.92 (CI 0.87 to 0.98), per 1 beat/min greater HR24 P = .002 and 0.93 (CI: 0.87 to 0.98), per 1 beat/min greater HR in the daytime P = .017). Conclusion: The 24-h HR and BP during ABP are independent and additive markers of increased LV mass in untreated hypertensive individuals.

AB - Background: We investigated whether mean heart rate (HR24) and blood pressure (BP) parameters during 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring (ABP) are independent or additive markers of left ventricular (LV) mass in subjects with newly diagnosed, untreated hypertension. Methods: A total of 250 patients (40% women, 60% men; mean age 59.6 ± 11 years) with essential hypertension who were attending the outpatient Hypertension Unit were studied. All patients underwent 24-h ABP and HR monitoring as well as echocardiography for assessment of left ventricular (LV) dimensions and function. Results: A decreasing HR 24 or increasing ABP parameters (ie, systolic, diastolic, mean BP, and pulse pressure) were associated with increasing LV mass (P < .001) and wall thickness (P < .01). In multivariate analysis, after adjusting for age, gender, body surface area, body mass index, hematocrit, glucose, cholesterol, smoking, and each of the measured ABP parameters separately, decreasing HR 24 was independently related to increasing LV mass in addition to ABP and body size parameters (P < .001). The addition of HR24 in different multivariate models for prediction of LV mass significantly increased the adjusted model r2 (range of r2 change: 0.039 to 0.064, P for change <.05). Decreasing HR24 or HR during daytime (6 am to 10 pm) was associated with a higher likelihood of LV hypertrophy in addition to ABP parameters (adjusted odds ratio 0.92 (CI 0.87 to 0.98), per 1 beat/min greater HR24 P = .002 and 0.93 (CI: 0.87 to 0.98), per 1 beat/min greater HR in the daytime P = .017). Conclusion: The 24-h HR and BP during ABP are independent and additive markers of increased LV mass in untreated hypertensive individuals.

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