Two physiologically distinct populations of neurons in the ventrolateral medulla innervate the locus coeruleus

Matthew Ennis, Gary Aston-Jones

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

62 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent anatomic studies indicate that the nucleus paragigantocellularis (PGi), located in the rostral ventrolateral medulla, strongly innervates the locus coeruleus (LC) while no such input derives from the more caudally located lateral reticular nucleus (LRN). In the present study, focal electrical stimulation of the LC was used to antidromically activate neurons in the ventrolateral medulla. A substantial number of PGi neurons were antidromically driven from the ipsilateral LC, while antidromic activation was virtually absent in LRN. Furthermore, several physiologic properties of antidromically driven cells in PGi define two populations within this group of neurons afferent to LC. These findings provide physiologic confirmation of an anatomically identified input to LC.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)275-282
Number of pages8
JournalBrain Research
Volume425
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 10 1987
Externally publishedYes

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Locus Coeruleus
Neurons
Population
Afferent Neurons
Electric Stimulation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Molecular Biology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Developmental Biology

Cite this

Two physiologically distinct populations of neurons in the ventrolateral medulla innervate the locus coeruleus. / Ennis, Matthew; Aston-Jones, Gary.

In: Brain Research, Vol. 425, No. 2, 10.11.1987, p. 275-282.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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