Typical vs. Maximal Measures of Personological Variables

Robert Klesges, Hugh Mcginley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Recent research has focused on various ways in which self-report personality measures might be improved. The present investigation continues this line of research by studying the effects of typical-maximal ratings, trait-consistency, familiarity, and interpersonal liking on self-reports of four personological variables: behavior aggression, trait-aggression, trait-dominance, and trait-friendliness. The results revealed that maximal ratings were clearly superior to typical ratings. Furthermore, maximal ratings attenuated the effects of the moderator variable of trait-consistency. Subject-peer familiarity and interpersonal liking also demonstrated significant effects. Implications for personality assessment are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)640-647
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Personality Assessment
Volume47
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1983

Fingerprint

Aggression
Self Report
Epidemiologic Effect Modifiers
Personality Assessment
Research
Personality
Recognition (Psychology)

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

Typical vs. Maximal Measures of Personological Variables. / Klesges, Robert; Mcginley, Hugh.

In: Journal of Personality Assessment, Vol. 47, No. 6, 01.01.1983, p. 640-647.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Klesges, Robert ; Mcginley, Hugh. / Typical vs. Maximal Measures of Personological Variables. In: Journal of Personality Assessment. 1983 ; Vol. 47, No. 6. pp. 640-647.
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