Ultrastructure of intermediate trophoblast cells during morphogenesis of syncytiotrophoblast in early human pregnancy.

Meena Jaggi, P. K. Mehrotra, S. C. Maitra, S. L. Agarwal, K. Das

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Abstract

During human embryonic development the process of differentiation begins in the cells covering the blastocyst, resulting in the formation of outer syncytial and inner cytotrophoblastic cell layers. Although the outer syncytial layer is known to be derived from the underlying layer of mononuclear cytotrophoblasts, the cellular mechanism involved in its morphogenesis is not clear. Furthermore, there is another type of cells, designated as intermediate trophoblasts, which play a vital role in syncytium formation. Using early first-trimester (6-10 weeks' gestation) human chorionic villi, a study was carried out to illustrate the ultrastructural features of these cells. It was observed that while there was a large number of coated vesicles, vacuoles, lysosomes and dense granules in the syncytiotrophoblast, in cytotrophoblasts there was a relatively smaller number. In intermediate cells, however, these organelles were more abundant. Moreover, a discontinuity in the plasma membrane along with gap junctions was frequently observed in these cells. Since these features represent the transitional stage of a differentiating cell, it is possible that the syncytiotrophoblast is in fact formed by the differentiation of intermediate trophoblasts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)113-118
Number of pages6
JournalEarly pregnancy : biology and medicine : the official journal of the Society for the Investigation of Early Pregnancy
Volume3
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jun 1 1997
Externally publishedYes

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Trophoblasts
Morphogenesis
Pregnancy
Coated Vesicles
Chorionic Villi
Gap Junctions
Human Development
Blastocyst
Giant Cells
First Pregnancy Trimester
Vacuoles
Lysosomes
Organelles
Embryonic Development
Cell Membrane

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

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abstract = "During human embryonic development the process of differentiation begins in the cells covering the blastocyst, resulting in the formation of outer syncytial and inner cytotrophoblastic cell layers. Although the outer syncytial layer is known to be derived from the underlying layer of mononuclear cytotrophoblasts, the cellular mechanism involved in its morphogenesis is not clear. Furthermore, there is another type of cells, designated as intermediate trophoblasts, which play a vital role in syncytium formation. Using early first-trimester (6-10 weeks' gestation) human chorionic villi, a study was carried out to illustrate the ultrastructural features of these cells. It was observed that while there was a large number of coated vesicles, vacuoles, lysosomes and dense granules in the syncytiotrophoblast, in cytotrophoblasts there was a relatively smaller number. In intermediate cells, however, these organelles were more abundant. Moreover, a discontinuity in the plasma membrane along with gap junctions was frequently observed in these cells. Since these features represent the transitional stage of a differentiating cell, it is possible that the syncytiotrophoblast is in fact formed by the differentiation of intermediate trophoblasts.",
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AU - Jaggi, Meena

AU - Mehrotra, P. K.

AU - Maitra, S. C.

AU - Agarwal, S. L.

AU - Das, K.

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AB - During human embryonic development the process of differentiation begins in the cells covering the blastocyst, resulting in the formation of outer syncytial and inner cytotrophoblastic cell layers. Although the outer syncytial layer is known to be derived from the underlying layer of mononuclear cytotrophoblasts, the cellular mechanism involved in its morphogenesis is not clear. Furthermore, there is another type of cells, designated as intermediate trophoblasts, which play a vital role in syncytium formation. Using early first-trimester (6-10 weeks' gestation) human chorionic villi, a study was carried out to illustrate the ultrastructural features of these cells. It was observed that while there was a large number of coated vesicles, vacuoles, lysosomes and dense granules in the syncytiotrophoblast, in cytotrophoblasts there was a relatively smaller number. In intermediate cells, however, these organelles were more abundant. Moreover, a discontinuity in the plasma membrane along with gap junctions was frequently observed in these cells. Since these features represent the transitional stage of a differentiating cell, it is possible that the syncytiotrophoblast is in fact formed by the differentiation of intermediate trophoblasts.

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