Uncovering critical properties of the human respiratory syncytial virus by combining in vitro assays and in silico analyses

Catherine A.A. Beauchemin, Young In Kim, Qin Yu, Giuseppe Ciaramella, John Devincenzo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Many aspects of the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) are still poorly understood. Yet these knowledge gaps have had and could continue to have adverse, unintended consequences for the efficacy and safety of antivirals and vaccines developed against RSV. Mathematical modelling was used to test and evaluate hypotheses about the rate of loss of RSV infectivity and the mechanisms and kinetics of RSV infection spread in SIAT cells in vitro. While the rate of loss of RSV integrity, as measured via qRT-PCR, is well-described by an exponential decay, the latter mechanism failed to describe the rate at which RSV A Long loses infectivity over time in vitro based on the data presented herein. This is unusual given that other viruses (HIV, HCV, influenza) have been shown to lose their infectivity exponentially in vitro, and indeed an exponential rate of loss of infectivity is always assumed in mathematical modelling and experimental analyses. The infectivity profile of RSV in HEp-2 and SIAT cells remained consistent over the course of an RSV infection, over time and a large range of infectivity. However, SIAT cells were found to be 100× less sensitive to RSV infection than HEp-2 cells. In particular, we found that RSV spreads inefficiently in SIAT cells, in a manner we show is consistent with the establishment of infection resistance in uninfected cells. SIAT cells are a good in vitro model in which to study RSV in vivo dissemination, yielding similar infection timescales. However, the higher sensitivity of HEp-2 cells to RSV together with its RSV infectivity profile being similar to that of SIAT cells, makes HEp-2 cells more suitable for quantifying RSV infectivity over the course of in vitro RSV infections in SIAT cells. Our findings highlight the importance and urgency of resolving the mechanisms at play in the dissemination of RSV infections in vitro, and the processes by which this infectivity is lost.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere0214708
JournalPloS one
Volume14
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2019

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Human respiratory syncytial virus
Respiratory Syncytial Viruses
Viruses
Computer Simulation
Assays
viruses
Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections
assays
pathogenicity
cells
infection
In Vitro Techniques
mathematical models
Infection
Human Influenza
Antiviral Agents

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

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Uncovering critical properties of the human respiratory syncytial virus by combining in vitro assays and in silico analyses. / Beauchemin, Catherine A.A.; Kim, Young In; Yu, Qin; Ciaramella, Giuseppe; Devincenzo, John.

In: PloS one, Vol. 14, No. 4, e0214708, 01.04.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Beauchemin, Catherine A.A. ; Kim, Young In ; Yu, Qin ; Ciaramella, Giuseppe ; Devincenzo, John. / Uncovering critical properties of the human respiratory syncytial virus by combining in vitro assays and in silico analyses. In: PloS one. 2019 ; Vol. 14, No. 4.
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