Understanding Cancer Worry among Patients in a Community Clinic-Based Colorectal Cancer Screening Intervention Study

Shannon M. Christy, Alyssa Schmidt, Hsiao Lan Wang, Steven K. Sutton, Stacy N. Davis, Enmanuel Chavarria, Rania Abdulla, Gwendolyn P. Quinn, Susan T. Vadaparampil, Ida Schultz, Richard Roetzheim, David Shibata, Cathy D. Meade, Clement K. Gwede

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background To reduce colorectal cancer (CRC) screening disparities, it is important to understand correlates of different types of cancer worry among ethnically diverse individuals. Objectives The current study examined the prevalence of three types of cancer worry (i.e., general cancer worry, CRC-specific worry, and worry about CRC test results) as well as sociodemographic and health-related predictors for each type of cancer worry. Methods Participants were aged 50-75, at average CRC risk, nonadherent to CRC screening guidelines, and enrolled in a randomized controlled trial to increase CRC screening. Participants completed a baseline questionnaire assessing sociodemographics, health beliefs, healthcare experiences, and three cancer worry measures. Associations between study variables were examined with separate univariate and multivariable logistic regression models. Results Responses from a total of 416 participants were used. Of these, 47% reported experiencing moderate-To-high levels of general cancer worry. Predictors of general cancer worry were salience and coherence (aOR = 1.1, 95% CI [1.0, 1.3]), perceived susceptibility (aOR = 1.2, 95% CI [1.1, 1.3), and social influence (aOR = 1.1, 95% CI [1.0, 0.1]). Fewer (23%) reported moderate-To-high levels of CRC-specific worry or CRC test worry (35%). Predictors of CRC worry were perceived susceptibility (aOR = 1.4, 95% CI [1.3, 1.6]) and social influence (aOR = 1.1, 95% CI [1.0, 1.2]); predictors of CRC test result worry were perceived susceptibility (aOR = 1.2, 95% CI [1.1, 1.3) and marital status (aOR = 2.0, 95% CI [1.1, 3.7] for married/partnered vs. single and aOR = 2.3, 95% CI [1.3, 4.1] for divorced/widowed vs. single). Discussion Perceived susceptibility consistently predicted the three types of cancer worry, whereas other predictors varied between cancer worry types and in magnitude of association. The three types of cancer worry were generally predicted by health beliefs, suggesting potential malleability. Future research should include multiple measures of cancer worry and clear definitions of how cancer worry is measured.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)275-285
Number of pages11
JournalNursing Research
Volume67
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2018

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Early Detection of Cancer
Colorectal Neoplasms
Neoplasms
Health
Logistic Models
Widowhood
Divorce
Marital Status
Randomized Controlled Trials
Cross-Sectional Studies
Guidelines
Delivery of Health Care

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Christy, S. M., Schmidt, A., Wang, H. L., Sutton, S. K., Davis, S. N., Chavarria, E., ... Gwede, C. K. (2018). Understanding Cancer Worry among Patients in a Community Clinic-Based Colorectal Cancer Screening Intervention Study. Nursing Research, 67(4), 275-285. https://doi.org/10.1097/NNR.0000000000000275

Understanding Cancer Worry among Patients in a Community Clinic-Based Colorectal Cancer Screening Intervention Study. / Christy, Shannon M.; Schmidt, Alyssa; Wang, Hsiao Lan; Sutton, Steven K.; Davis, Stacy N.; Chavarria, Enmanuel; Abdulla, Rania; Quinn, Gwendolyn P.; Vadaparampil, Susan T.; Schultz, Ida; Roetzheim, Richard; Shibata, David; Meade, Cathy D.; Gwede, Clement K.

In: Nursing Research, Vol. 67, No. 4, 01.07.2018, p. 275-285.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Christy, SM, Schmidt, A, Wang, HL, Sutton, SK, Davis, SN, Chavarria, E, Abdulla, R, Quinn, GP, Vadaparampil, ST, Schultz, I, Roetzheim, R, Shibata, D, Meade, CD & Gwede, CK 2018, 'Understanding Cancer Worry among Patients in a Community Clinic-Based Colorectal Cancer Screening Intervention Study', Nursing Research, vol. 67, no. 4, pp. 275-285. https://doi.org/10.1097/NNR.0000000000000275
Christy, Shannon M. ; Schmidt, Alyssa ; Wang, Hsiao Lan ; Sutton, Steven K. ; Davis, Stacy N. ; Chavarria, Enmanuel ; Abdulla, Rania ; Quinn, Gwendolyn P. ; Vadaparampil, Susan T. ; Schultz, Ida ; Roetzheim, Richard ; Shibata, David ; Meade, Cathy D. ; Gwede, Clement K. / Understanding Cancer Worry among Patients in a Community Clinic-Based Colorectal Cancer Screening Intervention Study. In: Nursing Research. 2018 ; Vol. 67, No. 4. pp. 275-285.
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abstract = "Background To reduce colorectal cancer (CRC) screening disparities, it is important to understand correlates of different types of cancer worry among ethnically diverse individuals. Objectives The current study examined the prevalence of three types of cancer worry (i.e., general cancer worry, CRC-specific worry, and worry about CRC test results) as well as sociodemographic and health-related predictors for each type of cancer worry. Methods Participants were aged 50-75, at average CRC risk, nonadherent to CRC screening guidelines, and enrolled in a randomized controlled trial to increase CRC screening. Participants completed a baseline questionnaire assessing sociodemographics, health beliefs, healthcare experiences, and three cancer worry measures. Associations between study variables were examined with separate univariate and multivariable logistic regression models. Results Responses from a total of 416 participants were used. Of these, 47{\%} reported experiencing moderate-To-high levels of general cancer worry. Predictors of general cancer worry were salience and coherence (aOR = 1.1, 95{\%} CI [1.0, 1.3]), perceived susceptibility (aOR = 1.2, 95{\%} CI [1.1, 1.3), and social influence (aOR = 1.1, 95{\%} CI [1.0, 0.1]). Fewer (23{\%}) reported moderate-To-high levels of CRC-specific worry or CRC test worry (35{\%}). Predictors of CRC worry were perceived susceptibility (aOR = 1.4, 95{\%} CI [1.3, 1.6]) and social influence (aOR = 1.1, 95{\%} CI [1.0, 1.2]); predictors of CRC test result worry were perceived susceptibility (aOR = 1.2, 95{\%} CI [1.1, 1.3) and marital status (aOR = 2.0, 95{\%} CI [1.1, 3.7] for married/partnered vs. single and aOR = 2.3, 95{\%} CI [1.3, 4.1] for divorced/widowed vs. single). Discussion Perceived susceptibility consistently predicted the three types of cancer worry, whereas other predictors varied between cancer worry types and in magnitude of association. The three types of cancer worry were generally predicted by health beliefs, suggesting potential malleability. Future research should include multiple measures of cancer worry and clear definitions of how cancer worry is measured.",
author = "Christy, {Shannon M.} and Alyssa Schmidt and Wang, {Hsiao Lan} and Sutton, {Steven K.} and Davis, {Stacy N.} and Enmanuel Chavarria and Rania Abdulla and Quinn, {Gwendolyn P.} and Vadaparampil, {Susan T.} and Ida Schultz and Richard Roetzheim and David Shibata and Meade, {Cathy D.} and Gwede, {Clement K.}",
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T1 - Understanding Cancer Worry among Patients in a Community Clinic-Based Colorectal Cancer Screening Intervention Study

AU - Christy, Shannon M.

AU - Schmidt, Alyssa

AU - Wang, Hsiao Lan

AU - Sutton, Steven K.

AU - Davis, Stacy N.

AU - Chavarria, Enmanuel

AU - Abdulla, Rania

AU - Quinn, Gwendolyn P.

AU - Vadaparampil, Susan T.

AU - Schultz, Ida

AU - Roetzheim, Richard

AU - Shibata, David

AU - Meade, Cathy D.

AU - Gwede, Clement K.

PY - 2018/7/1

Y1 - 2018/7/1

N2 - Background To reduce colorectal cancer (CRC) screening disparities, it is important to understand correlates of different types of cancer worry among ethnically diverse individuals. Objectives The current study examined the prevalence of three types of cancer worry (i.e., general cancer worry, CRC-specific worry, and worry about CRC test results) as well as sociodemographic and health-related predictors for each type of cancer worry. Methods Participants were aged 50-75, at average CRC risk, nonadherent to CRC screening guidelines, and enrolled in a randomized controlled trial to increase CRC screening. Participants completed a baseline questionnaire assessing sociodemographics, health beliefs, healthcare experiences, and three cancer worry measures. Associations between study variables were examined with separate univariate and multivariable logistic regression models. Results Responses from a total of 416 participants were used. Of these, 47% reported experiencing moderate-To-high levels of general cancer worry. Predictors of general cancer worry were salience and coherence (aOR = 1.1, 95% CI [1.0, 1.3]), perceived susceptibility (aOR = 1.2, 95% CI [1.1, 1.3), and social influence (aOR = 1.1, 95% CI [1.0, 0.1]). Fewer (23%) reported moderate-To-high levels of CRC-specific worry or CRC test worry (35%). Predictors of CRC worry were perceived susceptibility (aOR = 1.4, 95% CI [1.3, 1.6]) and social influence (aOR = 1.1, 95% CI [1.0, 1.2]); predictors of CRC test result worry were perceived susceptibility (aOR = 1.2, 95% CI [1.1, 1.3) and marital status (aOR = 2.0, 95% CI [1.1, 3.7] for married/partnered vs. single and aOR = 2.3, 95% CI [1.3, 4.1] for divorced/widowed vs. single). Discussion Perceived susceptibility consistently predicted the three types of cancer worry, whereas other predictors varied between cancer worry types and in magnitude of association. The three types of cancer worry were generally predicted by health beliefs, suggesting potential malleability. Future research should include multiple measures of cancer worry and clear definitions of how cancer worry is measured.

AB - Background To reduce colorectal cancer (CRC) screening disparities, it is important to understand correlates of different types of cancer worry among ethnically diverse individuals. Objectives The current study examined the prevalence of three types of cancer worry (i.e., general cancer worry, CRC-specific worry, and worry about CRC test results) as well as sociodemographic and health-related predictors for each type of cancer worry. Methods Participants were aged 50-75, at average CRC risk, nonadherent to CRC screening guidelines, and enrolled in a randomized controlled trial to increase CRC screening. Participants completed a baseline questionnaire assessing sociodemographics, health beliefs, healthcare experiences, and three cancer worry measures. Associations between study variables were examined with separate univariate and multivariable logistic regression models. Results Responses from a total of 416 participants were used. Of these, 47% reported experiencing moderate-To-high levels of general cancer worry. Predictors of general cancer worry were salience and coherence (aOR = 1.1, 95% CI [1.0, 1.3]), perceived susceptibility (aOR = 1.2, 95% CI [1.1, 1.3), and social influence (aOR = 1.1, 95% CI [1.0, 0.1]). Fewer (23%) reported moderate-To-high levels of CRC-specific worry or CRC test worry (35%). Predictors of CRC worry were perceived susceptibility (aOR = 1.4, 95% CI [1.3, 1.6]) and social influence (aOR = 1.1, 95% CI [1.0, 1.2]); predictors of CRC test result worry were perceived susceptibility (aOR = 1.2, 95% CI [1.1, 1.3) and marital status (aOR = 2.0, 95% CI [1.1, 3.7] for married/partnered vs. single and aOR = 2.3, 95% CI [1.3, 4.1] for divorced/widowed vs. single). Discussion Perceived susceptibility consistently predicted the three types of cancer worry, whereas other predictors varied between cancer worry types and in magnitude of association. The three types of cancer worry were generally predicted by health beliefs, suggesting potential malleability. Future research should include multiple measures of cancer worry and clear definitions of how cancer worry is measured.

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