Undocumented and at the end of life

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Three of the most contentious issues in contemporary American society-allocation of medical resources, end of life care, and immigration-converge when undocumented immigrant patients are facing the terminal phase of chronic illness. The lack of consistent, pragmatic policy in each of these spheres leaves us with little guidance for how to advocate for undocumented patients at the end of life. Limited resources and growing need compound the problem. Care for patients in this unfortunate situation should be grounded in clinical and economic reality as well as respect for the dignity of the individual to avoid exacerbating inequalities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)179-184
Number of pages6
JournalNarrative inquiry in bioethics
Volume4
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2014

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Terminal Care
Resource Allocation
Medical Societies
Emigration and Immigration
Patient Care
Chronic Disease
Economics
Undocumented Immigrants

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Undocumented and at the end of life. / Mendola, Annette.

In: Narrative inquiry in bioethics, Vol. 4, No. 2, 01.06.2014, p. 179-184.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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