Unresolved Pain Interference among Colorectal Cancer Survivors

Implications for Patient Care and Outcomes

Kelly Kenzik, Maria Pisu, Shelley A. Johns, Tamara Baker, Robert A. Oster, Elizabeth Kvale, Mona N. Fouad, Michelle Martin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Using a large sample of colorectal cancer (CRC) survivors we 1) describe pain interference (PI) prevalence across the cancer continuum; 2) identify demographic and clinical factors associated with PI and changes in PI; and 3) examine PI's relationship with survivors' job changes. Methods: CRC participants of the Cancer Care Outcomes Research and Surveillance Consortium completed surveys during the initial phase of care (baseline,<1 year, n=2,961) and follow-up (about 1-year postdiagnosis, n=2,303). PI was measured using the SF-12 item. Multiple logistic regression was used to identify predictors of PI. Model 1 evaluated moderate/high PI at baseline, Model 2 evaluated new/continued/increasing PI postdiagnosis follow-up, and Model 3 restricted to participants with baseline PI (N=603) and evaluated predictors of equivalent/increasing PI. Multivariable logistic regression was also used to examine whether PI predicted job change. Results: At baseline and follow-up, 24.7% and 23.7% of participants reported moderate/high PI, respectively. Among those with baseline PI, 46% had equivalent/increasing PI at follow-up. Near diagnosis and at follow-up, female gender, comorbidities, depression, chemotherapy and radiation were associated with moderate/high PI while older age was protective of PI. Pulmonary disease and heart failure comorbidities were associated with equivalent/increasing PI. PI was significantly associated with no longer having a job at follow-up among employed survivors. Conclusion: Almost half of survivors with PI during the initial phase of care had continued PI into post-treatment. Comorbidities, especially cardiovascular and pulmonary conditions, contributed to continued PI. PI may be related to continuing normal activities, that is, work, after completed treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1410-1425
Number of pages16
JournalPain Medicine (United States)
Volume16
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

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Survivors
Colorectal Neoplasms
Patient Care
Pain
Comorbidity
Logistic Models

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

Unresolved Pain Interference among Colorectal Cancer Survivors : Implications for Patient Care and Outcomes. / Kenzik, Kelly; Pisu, Maria; Johns, Shelley A.; Baker, Tamara; Oster, Robert A.; Kvale, Elizabeth; Fouad, Mona N.; Martin, Michelle.

In: Pain Medicine (United States), Vol. 16, No. 7, 01.01.2015, p. 1410-1425.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kenzik, Kelly ; Pisu, Maria ; Johns, Shelley A. ; Baker, Tamara ; Oster, Robert A. ; Kvale, Elizabeth ; Fouad, Mona N. ; Martin, Michelle. / Unresolved Pain Interference among Colorectal Cancer Survivors : Implications for Patient Care and Outcomes. In: Pain Medicine (United States). 2015 ; Vol. 16, No. 7. pp. 1410-1425.
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abstract = "Objective: Using a large sample of colorectal cancer (CRC) survivors we 1) describe pain interference (PI) prevalence across the cancer continuum; 2) identify demographic and clinical factors associated with PI and changes in PI; and 3) examine PI's relationship with survivors' job changes. Methods: CRC participants of the Cancer Care Outcomes Research and Surveillance Consortium completed surveys during the initial phase of care (baseline,<1 year, n=2,961) and follow-up (about 1-year postdiagnosis, n=2,303). PI was measured using the SF-12 item. Multiple logistic regression was used to identify predictors of PI. Model 1 evaluated moderate/high PI at baseline, Model 2 evaluated new/continued/increasing PI postdiagnosis follow-up, and Model 3 restricted to participants with baseline PI (N=603) and evaluated predictors of equivalent/increasing PI. Multivariable logistic regression was also used to examine whether PI predicted job change. Results: At baseline and follow-up, 24.7{\%} and 23.7{\%} of participants reported moderate/high PI, respectively. Among those with baseline PI, 46{\%} had equivalent/increasing PI at follow-up. Near diagnosis and at follow-up, female gender, comorbidities, depression, chemotherapy and radiation were associated with moderate/high PI while older age was protective of PI. Pulmonary disease and heart failure comorbidities were associated with equivalent/increasing PI. PI was significantly associated with no longer having a job at follow-up among employed survivors. Conclusion: Almost half of survivors with PI during the initial phase of care had continued PI into post-treatment. Comorbidities, especially cardiovascular and pulmonary conditions, contributed to continued PI. PI may be related to continuing normal activities, that is, work, after completed treatment.",
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AU - Baker, Tamara

AU - Oster, Robert A.

AU - Kvale, Elizabeth

AU - Fouad, Mona N.

AU - Martin, Michelle

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N2 - Objective: Using a large sample of colorectal cancer (CRC) survivors we 1) describe pain interference (PI) prevalence across the cancer continuum; 2) identify demographic and clinical factors associated with PI and changes in PI; and 3) examine PI's relationship with survivors' job changes. Methods: CRC participants of the Cancer Care Outcomes Research and Surveillance Consortium completed surveys during the initial phase of care (baseline,<1 year, n=2,961) and follow-up (about 1-year postdiagnosis, n=2,303). PI was measured using the SF-12 item. Multiple logistic regression was used to identify predictors of PI. Model 1 evaluated moderate/high PI at baseline, Model 2 evaluated new/continued/increasing PI postdiagnosis follow-up, and Model 3 restricted to participants with baseline PI (N=603) and evaluated predictors of equivalent/increasing PI. Multivariable logistic regression was also used to examine whether PI predicted job change. Results: At baseline and follow-up, 24.7% and 23.7% of participants reported moderate/high PI, respectively. Among those with baseline PI, 46% had equivalent/increasing PI at follow-up. Near diagnosis and at follow-up, female gender, comorbidities, depression, chemotherapy and radiation were associated with moderate/high PI while older age was protective of PI. Pulmonary disease and heart failure comorbidities were associated with equivalent/increasing PI. PI was significantly associated with no longer having a job at follow-up among employed survivors. Conclusion: Almost half of survivors with PI during the initial phase of care had continued PI into post-treatment. Comorbidities, especially cardiovascular and pulmonary conditions, contributed to continued PI. PI may be related to continuing normal activities, that is, work, after completed treatment.

AB - Objective: Using a large sample of colorectal cancer (CRC) survivors we 1) describe pain interference (PI) prevalence across the cancer continuum; 2) identify demographic and clinical factors associated with PI and changes in PI; and 3) examine PI's relationship with survivors' job changes. Methods: CRC participants of the Cancer Care Outcomes Research and Surveillance Consortium completed surveys during the initial phase of care (baseline,<1 year, n=2,961) and follow-up (about 1-year postdiagnosis, n=2,303). PI was measured using the SF-12 item. Multiple logistic regression was used to identify predictors of PI. Model 1 evaluated moderate/high PI at baseline, Model 2 evaluated new/continued/increasing PI postdiagnosis follow-up, and Model 3 restricted to participants with baseline PI (N=603) and evaluated predictors of equivalent/increasing PI. Multivariable logistic regression was also used to examine whether PI predicted job change. Results: At baseline and follow-up, 24.7% and 23.7% of participants reported moderate/high PI, respectively. Among those with baseline PI, 46% had equivalent/increasing PI at follow-up. Near diagnosis and at follow-up, female gender, comorbidities, depression, chemotherapy and radiation were associated with moderate/high PI while older age was protective of PI. Pulmonary disease and heart failure comorbidities were associated with equivalent/increasing PI. PI was significantly associated with no longer having a job at follow-up among employed survivors. Conclusion: Almost half of survivors with PI during the initial phase of care had continued PI into post-treatment. Comorbidities, especially cardiovascular and pulmonary conditions, contributed to continued PI. PI may be related to continuing normal activities, that is, work, after completed treatment.

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