Uric Acid-Induced Inflammation is Mediated by the Parathyroid Hormone:25-Hydroxyvitamin D Ratio in Obese Adolescents

Ramin Alemzadeh, Jessica Kichler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Elevated serum uric acid (SUA) level is strongly associated with prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS), elevated parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels, and 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] insufficiency in adults. We examined the relationship among SUA, [25(OH)D], PTH, and inflammation in obese adolescents, in obese adolescents with and without MS. Methods: Body mass index, body composition, 25(OH)D, PTH, fasting lipids, glucose, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), SUA, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), insulin, and the homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) were evaluated in 152 obese adolescents. Results: Hyperuricemia [SUA ≥6.0 mg/dL (357 μM)] was present in 54.6% of entire cohort without significant ethnic/racial differences. While SUA was negatively correlated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and 25(OH)D (P < 0.01), it was positively correlated with fat mass (FM), PTH, PTH:25(OH)D, and hs-CRP (P < 0.01). Vitamin D deficiency [25(OH)D <50 nM] was present in 47.4% of subjects, and PTH and 25(OH)D were inversely correlated (P < 0.0001). FM was negatively correlated with 25(OH)D (r = -0.29; P < 0.001), but was positively correlated with PTH (P < 0.0001). MS was identified in 53.3% of cohort with higher FM, SUA, hs-CRP, HOMA-IR, PTH, and PTH:25(OH)D ratio than the non-MS subgroup (P < 0.001) with similar 25(OH)D status. Multiple regression analysis showed that the PTH:25(OH)D ratio mediated the relationship between SUA and hs-CRP (β = 0.19, P < 0.05 to β = 0.15, P = 0.19). Conclusions: Hyperuricemia is strongly associated with PTH and hs-CRP levels independent of vitamin D status. The relationship between SUA and low-grade inflammation is mediated by the PTH:25(OH)D ratio in obese adolescents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)167-174
Number of pages8
JournalMetabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders
Volume14
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2016

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Uric Acid
Parathyroid Hormone
Inflammation
C-Reactive Protein
Serum
Hyperuricemia
Fats
Insulin Resistance
25-hydroxyvitamin D
Vitamin D Deficiency
Body Composition
Vitamin D
HDL Cholesterol
Fasting
Hemoglobins
Body Mass Index
Regression Analysis
Insulin
Lipids
Glucose

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Uric Acid-Induced Inflammation is Mediated by the Parathyroid Hormone:25-Hydroxyvitamin D Ratio in Obese Adolescents. / Alemzadeh, Ramin; Kichler, Jessica.

In: Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders, Vol. 14, No. 3, 01.04.2016, p. 167-174.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{c3021a9de4b049d48bedaee43c612b70,
title = "Uric Acid-Induced Inflammation is Mediated by the Parathyroid Hormone:25-Hydroxyvitamin D Ratio in Obese Adolescents",
abstract = "Background: Elevated serum uric acid (SUA) level is strongly associated with prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS), elevated parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels, and 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] insufficiency in adults. We examined the relationship among SUA, [25(OH)D], PTH, and inflammation in obese adolescents, in obese adolescents with and without MS. Methods: Body mass index, body composition, 25(OH)D, PTH, fasting lipids, glucose, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), SUA, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), insulin, and the homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) were evaluated in 152 obese adolescents. Results: Hyperuricemia [SUA ≥6.0 mg/dL (357 μM)] was present in 54.6{\%} of entire cohort without significant ethnic/racial differences. While SUA was negatively correlated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and 25(OH)D (P < 0.01), it was positively correlated with fat mass (FM), PTH, PTH:25(OH)D, and hs-CRP (P < 0.01). Vitamin D deficiency [25(OH)D <50 nM] was present in 47.4{\%} of subjects, and PTH and 25(OH)D were inversely correlated (P < 0.0001). FM was negatively correlated with 25(OH)D (r = -0.29; P < 0.001), but was positively correlated with PTH (P < 0.0001). MS was identified in 53.3{\%} of cohort with higher FM, SUA, hs-CRP, HOMA-IR, PTH, and PTH:25(OH)D ratio than the non-MS subgroup (P < 0.001) with similar 25(OH)D status. Multiple regression analysis showed that the PTH:25(OH)D ratio mediated the relationship between SUA and hs-CRP (β = 0.19, P < 0.05 to β = 0.15, P = 0.19). Conclusions: Hyperuricemia is strongly associated with PTH and hs-CRP levels independent of vitamin D status. The relationship between SUA and low-grade inflammation is mediated by the PTH:25(OH)D ratio in obese adolescents.",
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T1 - Uric Acid-Induced Inflammation is Mediated by the Parathyroid Hormone:25-Hydroxyvitamin D Ratio in Obese Adolescents

AU - Alemzadeh, Ramin

AU - Kichler, Jessica

PY - 2016/4/1

Y1 - 2016/4/1

N2 - Background: Elevated serum uric acid (SUA) level is strongly associated with prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS), elevated parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels, and 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] insufficiency in adults. We examined the relationship among SUA, [25(OH)D], PTH, and inflammation in obese adolescents, in obese adolescents with and without MS. Methods: Body mass index, body composition, 25(OH)D, PTH, fasting lipids, glucose, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), SUA, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), insulin, and the homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) were evaluated in 152 obese adolescents. Results: Hyperuricemia [SUA ≥6.0 mg/dL (357 μM)] was present in 54.6% of entire cohort without significant ethnic/racial differences. While SUA was negatively correlated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and 25(OH)D (P < 0.01), it was positively correlated with fat mass (FM), PTH, PTH:25(OH)D, and hs-CRP (P < 0.01). Vitamin D deficiency [25(OH)D <50 nM] was present in 47.4% of subjects, and PTH and 25(OH)D were inversely correlated (P < 0.0001). FM was negatively correlated with 25(OH)D (r = -0.29; P < 0.001), but was positively correlated with PTH (P < 0.0001). MS was identified in 53.3% of cohort with higher FM, SUA, hs-CRP, HOMA-IR, PTH, and PTH:25(OH)D ratio than the non-MS subgroup (P < 0.001) with similar 25(OH)D status. Multiple regression analysis showed that the PTH:25(OH)D ratio mediated the relationship between SUA and hs-CRP (β = 0.19, P < 0.05 to β = 0.15, P = 0.19). Conclusions: Hyperuricemia is strongly associated with PTH and hs-CRP levels independent of vitamin D status. The relationship between SUA and low-grade inflammation is mediated by the PTH:25(OH)D ratio in obese adolescents.

AB - Background: Elevated serum uric acid (SUA) level is strongly associated with prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS), elevated parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels, and 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] insufficiency in adults. We examined the relationship among SUA, [25(OH)D], PTH, and inflammation in obese adolescents, in obese adolescents with and without MS. Methods: Body mass index, body composition, 25(OH)D, PTH, fasting lipids, glucose, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), SUA, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), insulin, and the homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) were evaluated in 152 obese adolescents. Results: Hyperuricemia [SUA ≥6.0 mg/dL (357 μM)] was present in 54.6% of entire cohort without significant ethnic/racial differences. While SUA was negatively correlated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and 25(OH)D (P < 0.01), it was positively correlated with fat mass (FM), PTH, PTH:25(OH)D, and hs-CRP (P < 0.01). Vitamin D deficiency [25(OH)D <50 nM] was present in 47.4% of subjects, and PTH and 25(OH)D were inversely correlated (P < 0.0001). FM was negatively correlated with 25(OH)D (r = -0.29; P < 0.001), but was positively correlated with PTH (P < 0.0001). MS was identified in 53.3% of cohort with higher FM, SUA, hs-CRP, HOMA-IR, PTH, and PTH:25(OH)D ratio than the non-MS subgroup (P < 0.001) with similar 25(OH)D status. Multiple regression analysis showed that the PTH:25(OH)D ratio mediated the relationship between SUA and hs-CRP (β = 0.19, P < 0.05 to β = 0.15, P = 0.19). Conclusions: Hyperuricemia is strongly associated with PTH and hs-CRP levels independent of vitamin D status. The relationship between SUA and low-grade inflammation is mediated by the PTH:25(OH)D ratio in obese adolescents.

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