Urinary metabolites from mango (Mangifera indica L. cv. Keitt) galloyl derivatives and in vitro hydrolysis of gallotannins in physiological conditions

Ryan C. Barnes, Kimberly A. Krenek, Bernd Meibohm, Susanne U. Mertens-Talcott, Stephen T. Talcott

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Scope: The absorption, metabolism, and excretion of mango galloyl derivatives (GD) has not yet been investigated in humans, and studies investigating repeated dosages of polyphenols are limited. Methods and results: In this human pilot trial, healthy volunteers (age = 21-38 y, n = 11) consumed 400 g/day of mango-pulp (cv. Keitt) for 10 days, and seven metabolites of gallic acid (GA) were characterized and quantified in urine excreted over a 12 h period. Pyrogallol-O-sulfate and deoxypyrogallol-O-sulfate were found to be significantly more excreted between days 1 and 10 (p < 0.05) from 28.5 to 55.4 mg and 23.6 to 47.7 mg, respectively. Additionally, the in vitro hydrolysis of gallotannins (GTs) was monitored at physiological pH and temperature conditions, and after 4 h a significant (p < 0.05) shift in composition from relativity high to low molecular weight GTs was observed. Conclusion: Seven metabolites of GA were identified in the urine of healthy volunteers, and two microbial metabolites were found to be significantly more excreted following 10 days of mango consumption. Mango GTs were also found to release free GA in conditions similar to the intestines. GTs may serve as a pool of pro-GA compounds that can be absorbed or undergo microbial metabolism. Mango like all fruits and vegetables contains polyphenols. The key polyphenols in mango, gallic acid and gallotannins, are absorbed and metabolized in the human body in both the small intestine and the colon. In this study it was found that two colonic metabolites sourced from gallic acid were found to be significantly more excreted in the urine of people consuming mango after 10 days of chronic consumption indicating adaptation of metabolism by microorganisms residing in the colon.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)542-550
Number of pages9
JournalMolecular Nutrition and Food Research
Volume60
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2016

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Hydrolyzable Tannins
Mangifera
Mangifera indica
Gallic Acid
gallic acid
mangoes
Hydrolysis
hydrolysis
chemical derivatives
metabolites
Polyphenols
polyphenols
urine
Urine
colon
volunteers
metabolism
sulfates
Sulfates
mango pulp

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biotechnology
  • Food Science

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Urinary metabolites from mango (Mangifera indica L. cv. Keitt) galloyl derivatives and in vitro hydrolysis of gallotannins in physiological conditions. / Barnes, Ryan C.; Krenek, Kimberly A.; Meibohm, Bernd; Mertens-Talcott, Susanne U.; Talcott, Stephen T.

In: Molecular Nutrition and Food Research, Vol. 60, No. 3, 01.03.2016, p. 542-550.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Scope: The absorption, metabolism, and excretion of mango galloyl derivatives (GD) has not yet been investigated in humans, and studies investigating repeated dosages of polyphenols are limited. Methods and results: In this human pilot trial, healthy volunteers (age = 21-38 y, n = 11) consumed 400 g/day of mango-pulp (cv. Keitt) for 10 days, and seven metabolites of gallic acid (GA) were characterized and quantified in urine excreted over a 12 h period. Pyrogallol-O-sulfate and deoxypyrogallol-O-sulfate were found to be significantly more excreted between days 1 and 10 (p < 0.05) from 28.5 to 55.4 mg and 23.6 to 47.7 mg, respectively. Additionally, the in vitro hydrolysis of gallotannins (GTs) was monitored at physiological pH and temperature conditions, and after 4 h a significant (p < 0.05) shift in composition from relativity high to low molecular weight GTs was observed. Conclusion: Seven metabolites of GA were identified in the urine of healthy volunteers, and two microbial metabolites were found to be significantly more excreted following 10 days of mango consumption. Mango GTs were also found to release free GA in conditions similar to the intestines. GTs may serve as a pool of pro-GA compounds that can be absorbed or undergo microbial metabolism. Mango like all fruits and vegetables contains polyphenols. The key polyphenols in mango, gallic acid and gallotannins, are absorbed and metabolized in the human body in both the small intestine and the colon. In this study it was found that two colonic metabolites sourced from gallic acid were found to be significantly more excreted in the urine of people consuming mango after 10 days of chronic consumption indicating adaptation of metabolism by microorganisms residing in the colon.",
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AB - Scope: The absorption, metabolism, and excretion of mango galloyl derivatives (GD) has not yet been investigated in humans, and studies investigating repeated dosages of polyphenols are limited. Methods and results: In this human pilot trial, healthy volunteers (age = 21-38 y, n = 11) consumed 400 g/day of mango-pulp (cv. Keitt) for 10 days, and seven metabolites of gallic acid (GA) were characterized and quantified in urine excreted over a 12 h period. Pyrogallol-O-sulfate and deoxypyrogallol-O-sulfate were found to be significantly more excreted between days 1 and 10 (p < 0.05) from 28.5 to 55.4 mg and 23.6 to 47.7 mg, respectively. Additionally, the in vitro hydrolysis of gallotannins (GTs) was monitored at physiological pH and temperature conditions, and after 4 h a significant (p < 0.05) shift in composition from relativity high to low molecular weight GTs was observed. Conclusion: Seven metabolites of GA were identified in the urine of healthy volunteers, and two microbial metabolites were found to be significantly more excreted following 10 days of mango consumption. Mango GTs were also found to release free GA in conditions similar to the intestines. GTs may serve as a pool of pro-GA compounds that can be absorbed or undergo microbial metabolism. Mango like all fruits and vegetables contains polyphenols. The key polyphenols in mango, gallic acid and gallotannins, are absorbed and metabolized in the human body in both the small intestine and the colon. In this study it was found that two colonic metabolites sourced from gallic acid were found to be significantly more excreted in the urine of people consuming mango after 10 days of chronic consumption indicating adaptation of metabolism by microorganisms residing in the colon.

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