Urinary Tract Stones and Osteoporosis: Findings from the Women's Health Initiative

Laura D. Carbone, Kathleen M. Hovey, Christopher A. Andrews, Fridtjof Thomas, Mathew D. Sorensen, Carolyn J. Crandall, Nelson B. Watts, Monique Bethel, Karen Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Kidney and bladder stones (urinary tract stones) and osteoporosis are prevalent, serious conditions for postmenopausal women. Men with kidney stones are at increased risk of osteoporosis; however, the relationship of urinary tract stones to osteoporosis in postmenopausal women has not been established. The purpose of this study was to determine whether urinary tract stones are an independent risk factor for changes in bone mineral density (BMD) and incident fractures in women in the Women's Health Initiative (WHI). Data were obtained from 150,689 women in the Observational Study and Clinical Trials of the WHI with information on urinary tract stones status: 9856 of these women reported urinary tract stones at baseline and/or incident urinary tract stones during follow-up. Cox regression models were used to determine the association of urinary tract stones with incident fractures and linear mixed models were used to investigate the relationship of urinary tract stones with changes in BMD that occurred during WHI. Follow-up was over an average of 8 years. Models were adjusted for demographic and clinical factors, medication use, and dietary histories. In unadjusted models there was a significant association of urinary tract stones with incident total fractures (HR 1.10; 95% CI, 1.04 to 1.17). However, in covariate adjusted analyses, urinary tract stones were not significantly related to changes in BMD at any skeletal site or to incident fractures. In conclusion, urinary tract stones in postmenopausal women are not an independent risk factor for osteoporosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2096-2102
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Bone and Mineral Research
Volume30
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2015

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Urinary Calculi
Women's Health
Osteoporosis
Bone Density
Kidney Calculi
Urinary Bladder Calculi
Women's Rights
Postmenopausal Osteoporosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Observational Studies
Linear Models
Demography
Clinical Trials

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Urinary Tract Stones and Osteoporosis : Findings from the Women's Health Initiative. / Carbone, Laura D.; Hovey, Kathleen M.; Andrews, Christopher A.; Thomas, Fridtjof; Sorensen, Mathew D.; Crandall, Carolyn J.; Watts, Nelson B.; Bethel, Monique; Johnson, Karen.

In: Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, Vol. 30, No. 11, 01.11.2015, p. 2096-2102.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Carbone, LD, Hovey, KM, Andrews, CA, Thomas, F, Sorensen, MD, Crandall, CJ, Watts, NB, Bethel, M & Johnson, K 2015, 'Urinary Tract Stones and Osteoporosis: Findings from the Women's Health Initiative', Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, vol. 30, no. 11, pp. 2096-2102. https://doi.org/10.1002/jbmr.2553
Carbone, Laura D. ; Hovey, Kathleen M. ; Andrews, Christopher A. ; Thomas, Fridtjof ; Sorensen, Mathew D. ; Crandall, Carolyn J. ; Watts, Nelson B. ; Bethel, Monique ; Johnson, Karen. / Urinary Tract Stones and Osteoporosis : Findings from the Women's Health Initiative. In: Journal of Bone and Mineral Research. 2015 ; Vol. 30, No. 11. pp. 2096-2102.
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