Urine chemokines indicate pathogenic association of obesity with BPH/LUTS

Pradeep Tyagi, Saundra S. Motley, Mahendra Kashyap, Subrata Pore, Jeffrey Gingrich, Zhou Wang, Naoki Yoshimura, Jay H. Fowke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: High prevalence of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) consistent with benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) is associated with obesity and prostatic inflammation. Here, we investigated whether chemokines associated with obesity and prostatic inflammation can be measured in normally voided urine of BPH/LUTS patients to demonstrate the mechanistic association between obesity and BPH/LUTS. Methods: Frozen urine specimens of BPH/LUTS patients enrolled in the Nashville Men’s Health Study were sent for blinded analysis to University of Pittsburgh. Thirty patients were blocked by their AUA-SI (>7 or ≤7) and prostatic enlargement (<40, 40–60, >60 cc). Clinical parameters including age, prostate size, and medications were derived from chart review. CXC chemokines (CXCL-1, CXCL-8, and CXCL-10), CC chemokines (CCL2 and CCL3), and sIL-1ra were measured in thawed urine using Luminex™ xMAP® technology and ELISA for NGF. Results: Urinary CCL2 levels were several fold higher compared with the other six proteins, of which CCL3 was detectable in less than one-fourth of patients. Urine levels of sIL-1ra and CXCL-8 were significantly associated with increasing BMI and waist circumference in BPH patients. CXCL-8 showed a marginal association with overall AUA-SI scores, as well as obstructive (p = 0.08) symptom subscores. Prostate volume was inversely and marginally associated with urinary CXCL-10 (p = 0.09). Conclusions: Urine levels of CXCL-8, CXCL-10, and sIL-1ra were associated with varying degrees with LUTS severity, prostate size, and obesity, respectively. These findings in urine are consistent with past studies of chemokine levels from expressed prostatic secretions and demonstrate the potential of noninvasively measured chemokine in urine to objectively classify BPH/LUTS patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1051-1058
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Urology and Nephrology
Volume47
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 27 2015
Externally publishedYes

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Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms
Chemokines
Hyperplasia
Prostate
Obesity
Urine
Inflammation
Chemokine CCL3
Men's Health
CXC Chemokines
CC Chemokines
Chemokine CCL2
Waist Circumference
Nerve Growth Factor
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Technology

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Nephrology
  • Urology

Cite this

Urine chemokines indicate pathogenic association of obesity with BPH/LUTS. / Tyagi, Pradeep; Motley, Saundra S.; Kashyap, Mahendra; Pore, Subrata; Gingrich, Jeffrey; Wang, Zhou; Yoshimura, Naoki; Fowke, Jay H.

In: International Urology and Nephrology, Vol. 47, No. 7, 27.07.2015, p. 1051-1058.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tyagi, P, Motley, SS, Kashyap, M, Pore, S, Gingrich, J, Wang, Z, Yoshimura, N & Fowke, JH 2015, 'Urine chemokines indicate pathogenic association of obesity with BPH/LUTS', International Urology and Nephrology, vol. 47, no. 7, pp. 1051-1058. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11255-015-0992-2
Tyagi, Pradeep ; Motley, Saundra S. ; Kashyap, Mahendra ; Pore, Subrata ; Gingrich, Jeffrey ; Wang, Zhou ; Yoshimura, Naoki ; Fowke, Jay H. / Urine chemokines indicate pathogenic association of obesity with BPH/LUTS. In: International Urology and Nephrology. 2015 ; Vol. 47, No. 7. pp. 1051-1058.
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abstract = "Objectives: High prevalence of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) consistent with benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) is associated with obesity and prostatic inflammation. Here, we investigated whether chemokines associated with obesity and prostatic inflammation can be measured in normally voided urine of BPH/LUTS patients to demonstrate the mechanistic association between obesity and BPH/LUTS. Methods: Frozen urine specimens of BPH/LUTS patients enrolled in the Nashville Men’s Health Study were sent for blinded analysis to University of Pittsburgh. Thirty patients were blocked by their AUA-SI (>7 or ≤7) and prostatic enlargement (<40, 40–60, >60 cc). Clinical parameters including age, prostate size, and medications were derived from chart review. CXC chemokines (CXCL-1, CXCL-8, and CXCL-10), CC chemokines (CCL2 and CCL3), and sIL-1ra were measured in thawed urine using Luminex™ xMAP{\circledR} technology and ELISA for NGF. Results: Urinary CCL2 levels were several fold higher compared with the other six proteins, of which CCL3 was detectable in less than one-fourth of patients. Urine levels of sIL-1ra and CXCL-8 were significantly associated with increasing BMI and waist circumference in BPH patients. CXCL-8 showed a marginal association with overall AUA-SI scores, as well as obstructive (p = 0.08) symptom subscores. Prostate volume was inversely and marginally associated with urinary CXCL-10 (p = 0.09). Conclusions: Urine levels of CXCL-8, CXCL-10, and sIL-1ra were associated with varying degrees with LUTS severity, prostate size, and obesity, respectively. These findings in urine are consistent with past studies of chemokine levels from expressed prostatic secretions and demonstrate the potential of noninvasively measured chemokine in urine to objectively classify BPH/LUTS patients.",
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T1 - Urine chemokines indicate pathogenic association of obesity with BPH/LUTS

AU - Tyagi, Pradeep

AU - Motley, Saundra S.

AU - Kashyap, Mahendra

AU - Pore, Subrata

AU - Gingrich, Jeffrey

AU - Wang, Zhou

AU - Yoshimura, Naoki

AU - Fowke, Jay H.

PY - 2015/7/27

Y1 - 2015/7/27

N2 - Objectives: High prevalence of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) consistent with benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) is associated with obesity and prostatic inflammation. Here, we investigated whether chemokines associated with obesity and prostatic inflammation can be measured in normally voided urine of BPH/LUTS patients to demonstrate the mechanistic association between obesity and BPH/LUTS. Methods: Frozen urine specimens of BPH/LUTS patients enrolled in the Nashville Men’s Health Study were sent for blinded analysis to University of Pittsburgh. Thirty patients were blocked by their AUA-SI (>7 or ≤7) and prostatic enlargement (<40, 40–60, >60 cc). Clinical parameters including age, prostate size, and medications were derived from chart review. CXC chemokines (CXCL-1, CXCL-8, and CXCL-10), CC chemokines (CCL2 and CCL3), and sIL-1ra were measured in thawed urine using Luminex™ xMAP® technology and ELISA for NGF. Results: Urinary CCL2 levels were several fold higher compared with the other six proteins, of which CCL3 was detectable in less than one-fourth of patients. Urine levels of sIL-1ra and CXCL-8 were significantly associated with increasing BMI and waist circumference in BPH patients. CXCL-8 showed a marginal association with overall AUA-SI scores, as well as obstructive (p = 0.08) symptom subscores. Prostate volume was inversely and marginally associated with urinary CXCL-10 (p = 0.09). Conclusions: Urine levels of CXCL-8, CXCL-10, and sIL-1ra were associated with varying degrees with LUTS severity, prostate size, and obesity, respectively. These findings in urine are consistent with past studies of chemokine levels from expressed prostatic secretions and demonstrate the potential of noninvasively measured chemokine in urine to objectively classify BPH/LUTS patients.

AB - Objectives: High prevalence of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) consistent with benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) is associated with obesity and prostatic inflammation. Here, we investigated whether chemokines associated with obesity and prostatic inflammation can be measured in normally voided urine of BPH/LUTS patients to demonstrate the mechanistic association between obesity and BPH/LUTS. Methods: Frozen urine specimens of BPH/LUTS patients enrolled in the Nashville Men’s Health Study were sent for blinded analysis to University of Pittsburgh. Thirty patients were blocked by their AUA-SI (>7 or ≤7) and prostatic enlargement (<40, 40–60, >60 cc). Clinical parameters including age, prostate size, and medications were derived from chart review. CXC chemokines (CXCL-1, CXCL-8, and CXCL-10), CC chemokines (CCL2 and CCL3), and sIL-1ra were measured in thawed urine using Luminex™ xMAP® technology and ELISA for NGF. Results: Urinary CCL2 levels were several fold higher compared with the other six proteins, of which CCL3 was detectable in less than one-fourth of patients. Urine levels of sIL-1ra and CXCL-8 were significantly associated with increasing BMI and waist circumference in BPH patients. CXCL-8 showed a marginal association with overall AUA-SI scores, as well as obstructive (p = 0.08) symptom subscores. Prostate volume was inversely and marginally associated with urinary CXCL-10 (p = 0.09). Conclusions: Urine levels of CXCL-8, CXCL-10, and sIL-1ra were associated with varying degrees with LUTS severity, prostate size, and obesity, respectively. These findings in urine are consistent with past studies of chemokine levels from expressed prostatic secretions and demonstrate the potential of noninvasively measured chemokine in urine to objectively classify BPH/LUTS patients.

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