Use of a "kickstand" modification for external fixation of lower extremity fractures in children

Jeffrey R. Sawyer, Derek M. Kelly, Leslie N. Rhodes, James Beaty, S. Terry Canale, William C. Warner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate and describe the kickstand modification and its use in children with lower extremity fractures. Methods: Retrospective review identified eight children in whom the kickstand technique was used during treatment of their lower extremity fractures. The seven boys and one girl had a mean age of 11.8 years. All fractures were caused by high-energy trauma. Five of the eight tibial fractures were open fractures (one type 1, one type 2, and three type 3B), and five of the eight patients had multiple extremity fractures. Results: Additional procedures were required in six of the eight children, four of whom had multiple lower extremity fractures. No additional pressure-relieving modalities were used in any patient. The kickstand did not affect the fracture reduction, prevent patient mobilization, or require operative adjustment in any patient, and none had any skin pressure-related complications on the heel of the affected extremity. Conclusion: In pediatric patients with lower extremity trauma, the addition of a kickstand to the external fixator provides a simple, inexpensive, lightweight, adjustable, and adaptable method for encouraging elevation of the injured extremity, which facilitates edema control; it also allows easy neurovascular monitoring and wound care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)63-67
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Children's Orthopaedics
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2011

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Lower Extremity
Extremities
Wounds and Injuries
Pressure
External Fixators
Fracture Fixation
Tibial Fractures
Open Fractures
Heel
Edema
Pediatrics
Skin
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Use of a "kickstand" modification for external fixation of lower extremity fractures in children. / Sawyer, Jeffrey R.; Kelly, Derek M.; Rhodes, Leslie N.; Beaty, James; Canale, S. Terry; Warner, William C.

In: Journal of Children's Orthopaedics, Vol. 5, No. 1, 01.01.2011, p. 63-67.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sawyer, Jeffrey R. ; Kelly, Derek M. ; Rhodes, Leslie N. ; Beaty, James ; Canale, S. Terry ; Warner, William C. / Use of a "kickstand" modification for external fixation of lower extremity fractures in children. In: Journal of Children's Orthopaedics. 2011 ; Vol. 5, No. 1. pp. 63-67.
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