Use of electronic learning modules for teaching pharmacy and nursing staff

How to locate and utilize drug information sources in a poison control center

Kristie Williams, Tracy Hagemann, Scott Schaeffer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The primary purpose of this study was to help pharmacist and nursing specialists in poison information (SPIs) recognize the variety of electronic references available that could supplement Micromedex® to aid them with their calls at the poison control center (PCC). A secondary objective was to ascertain whether the training modules were an effective way to educate SPIs about electronic resources and how to use them effectively. Methods: Self-paced electronic training was presented in five modules: eFacts, Lexi-comp, AccessMedicine/AccessPharmacy/STAT!Ref, Medline Part 1, and Medline Part 2. After reviewing the objectives, the SPI was directed to a pre-test designed to establish current understanding of the material in that module. They then progressed through a slide show, designed to give information about the resource and application in finding information related to poisonings and toxicity. A post-test was administered to evaluate the knowledge gained and the application of that knowledge in answering typical questions from callers. Results: Fourteen of 20 employees took the assessment: eight pharmacists, two nurses, one physician's assistant, and three students. Post-test scores were increased for all modules except in Module 3: Access Medicine/Access Pharmacy/STAT!Ref, with the highest increase in scores occurring for the Medline modules. Feedback was overall positive, and all employees said they had learned something that they did not know before taking the assessment. Conclusions: This training program helped SPIs to recognize electronic references that could aid in finding information relating to calls at the PCC, and it appeared to be an effective way to educate SPIs about these electronic resources.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)39-43
Number of pages5
JournalCurrents in Pharmacy Teaching and Learning
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Poison Control Centers
Nursing
Poisons
Nursing Staff
Teaching
Learning
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Pharmacists
Physician Assistants
Personnel
Poisoning
Nurses
Medicine
Students
Education
Toxicity
Feedback

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacy
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)

Cite this

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title = "Use of electronic learning modules for teaching pharmacy and nursing staff: How to locate and utilize drug information sources in a poison control center",
abstract = "Objective: The primary purpose of this study was to help pharmacist and nursing specialists in poison information (SPIs) recognize the variety of electronic references available that could supplement Micromedex{\circledR} to aid them with their calls at the poison control center (PCC). A secondary objective was to ascertain whether the training modules were an effective way to educate SPIs about electronic resources and how to use them effectively. Methods: Self-paced electronic training was presented in five modules: eFacts, Lexi-comp, AccessMedicine/AccessPharmacy/STAT!Ref, Medline Part 1, and Medline Part 2. After reviewing the objectives, the SPI was directed to a pre-test designed to establish current understanding of the material in that module. They then progressed through a slide show, designed to give information about the resource and application in finding information related to poisonings and toxicity. A post-test was administered to evaluate the knowledge gained and the application of that knowledge in answering typical questions from callers. Results: Fourteen of 20 employees took the assessment: eight pharmacists, two nurses, one physician's assistant, and three students. Post-test scores were increased for all modules except in Module 3: Access Medicine/Access Pharmacy/STAT!Ref, with the highest increase in scores occurring for the Medline modules. Feedback was overall positive, and all employees said they had learned something that they did not know before taking the assessment. Conclusions: This training program helped SPIs to recognize electronic references that could aid in finding information relating to calls at the PCC, and it appeared to be an effective way to educate SPIs about these electronic resources.",
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