Use of social cognitive theory to guide a medical treatment adherence intervention

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Abstract

In this paper, we discuss the application of social cognitive theory as the basis for an intervention to promote medical treatment adherence among renal transplant recipients (RTRs). Social cognitive theory proposes that behavior is affected by multiple influences including environmental and personal (biological, affective, cognitive) factors, and aspects of the behavior itself. Similarly, research including our own indicates that there are multiple barriers and/or causes of non-adherence to medical treatment, including physiological, psychological, environmental, locus of control, economic, medical, and educational factors. Further, social cognitive theory suggests that a person must believe in his/her ability to perform a behavior (i.e., self-efficacy) and must perceive a benefit to the behavior; moreover, a person must place value on the consequences or outcomes associated with the behavior. Therefore, interventions to improve adherence should address each factor relevant to the individual recipient and incorporate elements of benefits and outcomes/consequences. Behavioral contracting, a behavior modification technique guided by social cognitive theory, is a promising approach to adherence intervention as it incorporates behavioral, cognitive, social, and environmental components to address a target behavior. Contracts are patient-specific written agreements between the patient and practitioner that generally identify and modify: (1) antecedents of the target behavior(s); (2) the target behavior(s); and (3) the consequences that shape the target behavior(s). We hypothesize that a behavioral contract intervention grounded in social cognitive theory will improve the medical treatment adherence behaviors of renal transplant recipients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)97-107
Number of pages11
JournalInternational Journal of Interdisciplinary Social Sciences
Volume5
Issue number7
StatePublished - Dec 1 2010

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cognitive theory
physician's care
recipient
behavior modification
cognitive factors
human being
locus of control
self-efficacy
cause

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

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title = "Use of social cognitive theory to guide a medical treatment adherence intervention",
abstract = "In this paper, we discuss the application of social cognitive theory as the basis for an intervention to promote medical treatment adherence among renal transplant recipients (RTRs). Social cognitive theory proposes that behavior is affected by multiple influences including environmental and personal (biological, affective, cognitive) factors, and aspects of the behavior itself. Similarly, research including our own indicates that there are multiple barriers and/or causes of non-adherence to medical treatment, including physiological, psychological, environmental, locus of control, economic, medical, and educational factors. Further, social cognitive theory suggests that a person must believe in his/her ability to perform a behavior (i.e., self-efficacy) and must perceive a benefit to the behavior; moreover, a person must place value on the consequences or outcomes associated with the behavior. Therefore, interventions to improve adherence should address each factor relevant to the individual recipient and incorporate elements of benefits and outcomes/consequences. Behavioral contracting, a behavior modification technique guided by social cognitive theory, is a promising approach to adherence intervention as it incorporates behavioral, cognitive, social, and environmental components to address a target behavior. Contracts are patient-specific written agreements between the patient and practitioner that generally identify and modify: (1) antecedents of the target behavior(s); (2) the target behavior(s); and (3) the consequences that shape the target behavior(s). We hypothesize that a behavioral contract intervention grounded in social cognitive theory will improve the medical treatment adherence behaviors of renal transplant recipients.",
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